Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-zdfhw Total loading time: 0.417 Render date: 2022-08-18T09:53:26.179Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

The Library versus the Internet: Literary Studies under Siege?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 October 2020

Extract

Along with many other aspects of north american culture, literary studies is being swept into the digital age. In considering what this might mean, I examine in particular how the Internet, with its many and protean conveniences for literature, is beginning to supplant the library, that traditional bastion of the text. The prospects for literature are not necessarily favorable. While libraries have been attempting to adapt to the Internet, the nature of the digital medium and some of the rhetoric that has attended it invoke troubling questions, raising the possibility that central features of literary studies may be in danger of being disregarded or marginalized. The digitizing of literature affects how we read and what we read, methods of study, the preservation of the archive, and the forms taken by new writing, some of which is specifically designed to exploit the electronic medium. In this paper I offer a sketch of the problems, possibilities, and paradoxes that we face as literary scholars.

Type
The Changing Profession
Information
PMLA , Volume 116 , Issue 5 , October 2001 , pp. 1405 - 1414
Copyright
Copyright © Modern Language Association of America, 2001

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Agre, Philip E.Designing the New Information Services.” Educom Review Sept.-Oct. 1999: 12+. 20 Feb. 2001 <http://dlis.gseis.ucla.edu/people/pagre/scoug.html>..>Google Scholar
Bergson, Henri. Time and Freewill. Trans. F. L. Pogson. London: Allen, 1910.Google Scholar
Birkerts, Sven. The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age. New York: Fawcett, 1994.Google Scholar
Bolter, Jay David. Writing Space: The Computer, Hypertext, and the History of Writing. Hillsdale: Erlbaum, 1992.Google Scholar
Brand, Stewart, and Sanders, Terry. “Escaping the Digital Dark Age.” Library Journal 1 Feb. 1999: 4648.Google Scholar
Bush, Vannevar. “As We May Think.” Atlantic Monthly July 1945: 101–08.Google Scholar
Caplan, Priscilla. “Oh What a Tangled Web We Weave: Opportunities and Challenges for Standards Development in the Digital Library Arena.” First Monday 5.6 (2000). 20 Feb. 2001 <http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue5_6/caplan/index.html>.Google Scholar
Case, Beau David. “Love's Labour's Lost: The Failure of Traditional Selection Practice in the Acquisition of Humanities Electronic Texts.” Library Trends 48 (2000): 729–47.Google Scholar
Clare, John. “Shakespeare Ousted by Media Studies in Proposed New GCSE.” Electronic Telegraph 8 Feb. 2001. 24 July 2001 <http://news.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2001/02/08/ngcse08.xml>..>Google Scholar
“Comparison of CPI and USPPI Rates of Increase.” American Libraries May 2000. Create Change: A Resource for Faculty and Librarian Action to Reclaim Scholarly Communication. Assn. of Research Libs., Assn. of Coll. and Research Libs., and Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition. 3 Aug. 2001 <http://www.createchange.org/resources/Table_Pages/JustTables/TABLE_CPI_USPPI.html>..>Google Scholar
Create Change. Create Change: A Resource for Faculty and Librarian Action to Reclaim Scholarly Communication. 25 May 2000. Assn. of Research Libs., Assn. of Coll. and Research Libs., and Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition. 20 Feb. 2001 <http://www.createchange.org/change.html>..>Google Scholar
Deleuze, Gilles. Bergsonism. Trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara Habberiam. New York: Zone, 1988.Google Scholar
Dobson, Teresa, and Miall, David S.Orienting the Reader? A Study of Literary Hypertexts.” Spiel 17 (1998): 249–61.Google Scholar
Dupuy, Jean-Pierre. “Myths of the Informational Society.” The Myths of Information: Technology and Postindustrial Culture. Ed. Woodward, Kathleen. Madison: Coda, 1980. 317.Google Scholar
Fano, Robert C. Commentary. Computers and the World of the Future. Ed. Greenberger, Martin. Cambridge: MIT, 1962. 162–66.Google Scholar
Hamad, Stevan. “Free at Last: The Future of Peer-Reviewed Journals.” D-Lib Magazine Dec. 1999. 20 Feb. 2001 <http://www.dlib.org/dlib/december99/12harnad.html>..>Google Scholar
Hayles, N. Katherine. “The Condition of Virtuality.” The Digital Dialectic: New Essays on New Media. Ed. Lunenfeld, Peter. Cambridge: MIT P, 1999. 6894.Google Scholar
Heim, Michael. “The Cyberspace Dialectic.” The Digital Dialectic: New Essays on New Media. Ed. Lunenfeld, Peter. Cambridge: MIT P, 1999. 2445.Google Scholar
Innis, Harold A. The Bias of Communication. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1951.Google Scholar
Johnson-Eilola, Johndan. Nostalgic Angels: Rearticulating Hypertext Writing. Norwood: Ablex, 1997.Google Scholar
Kemeny, John G.A Library for 2000 A.D.” Computers and the World of the Future. Ed. Greenberger, Martin. Cambridge: MIT P, 1962. 134–62.Google Scholar
Lancaster, F. W. Toward Paperless Information Systems. New York: Academic, 1978.Google Scholar
Landow, George. Hypertext: The Convergence of Contemporary Critical Theory and Technology. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1992.Google Scholar
Levy, Pierre. Collective Intelligence: Mankind's Emerging World in Cyberspace. Trans. Robert Bononno. Cambridge: Perseus, 1997.Google Scholar
A Library Advocate's Guide to Building Information Literate Communities. Amer. Libs. Assn., 2001. 20 Feb. 2001 <http://www.ala.org/pio/advocacy/informationliteracy.pdf>..>Google Scholar
“Library of Congress Will Not Digitize Books.” Tech Law Journal 15 Apr. 2000. 20 Feb. 2001 <http://www.techlawjournal.com/educ/20000415.htm>..>Google Scholar
Miall, David S.The Hypertextual Moment.” English Studies in Canada 24 (1998): 157–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miller, Ruth H.Electronic Resources and Academic Libraries, 1890–2000: A Historical Perspective.” Library Trends 48 (2000): 645–70.Google Scholar
Moulthrop, Stuart. “Computing, Humanism, and the Coming Age of Print.” “Is Humanities Computing an Academic Discipline?” Clemons Lib., U of Virginia, Charlottesville. 3 Dec. 1999. 20 Feb. 2001 <http://raven.ubalt.edu/staff/moulthrop/essays/uva99/index.htm>..>Google Scholar
Nell, Victor. Lost in a Book: The Psychology of Reading for Pleasure. New Haven: Yale UP, 1988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nelson, Theodore H.As We Will Think.” From Memex to Hypertext: Vannevar Bush and the Mind's Machine. Ed. Nyce, James M. and Kahn, Paul. Boston: Academic, 1991.245–60.Google Scholar
Odlyzko, Andrew. Smart and Stupid Networks: Why the Internet Is like Microsoft. Rev. vers. 6 Oct. 1998. AT&T Labs. 20 Feb. 2001 <http://www.research.att.com/~amo/doc/stupid.networks.pdf>..>Google Scholar
Okerson, Ann. “Are We There Yet? Online E-Resources Ten Years After.” Library Trends 48 (2000): 671–93.Google Scholar
Pankake, Martha. “Humanities Research in the 90s: What Scholars Need; What Librarians Can Do.” Library Hi Tech 9 (1991): 915.Google Scholar
Patterson, Nancy G.Hypertext and the Changing Roles of Readers.” English Journal 90.2 (2000): 7480.Google Scholar
Polanyi, Michael. The Tacit Dimension. Garden City: Doubleday, 1966.Google Scholar
Raitt, David. “Digital Library Initiatives across Europe.” Computers in Libraries Nov.-Dec. 2000: 26–35. 20 Feb. 2001 <http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/nov00/raitt.htm>..>Google Scholar
Schuyler, Michael. “Prognostications on Technology Unbound; or, The Library to Come.” Computers in Libraries May 1999:30–32.Google Scholar
“Serendipity.” UK Public Libraries Page. Comp. Sheila Harden and Robert Harden. 27 July 2001. 30 July 2001 <http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/square/ac940/serendip.html>..>Google Scholar
Siemens, Ray, et al. “The Credibility of Electronic Publishing: A Report to the Humanities and Social Sciences Federation of Canada.” Text Technology, forthcoming.Google Scholar
“Subscription Prices.” Library Journal 15 Apr. 1994; 15 Apr. 2000. Create Change: A Resource for Faculty and Librarian Action to Reclaim Scholarly Communication. Assn. of Research Libs., Assn. of Coll. and Research Libs., and Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition. 3 Aug. 2001 <http://www.createchange.org/resources/Table_Pages/JustTables/TABLE_SubscriptionPrices.html>..>Google Scholar
Thompson, James. The End of Libraries. London: Bingley, 1982.Google Scholar
To Publish and Perish.” Spec. issue of Policy Perspectives 7.4 (1998). Assn. of Research Libs., Assn. of Amer. Univs., and Pew Higher Educ. Roundtable. 20 Feb. 2001 <http://www.arl.org/scomm/pew/pewrept.html>..>Google Scholar
Van Peer, Willie. “Quantitative Studies of Literature: A Critique and an Outlook.” Computers and the Humanities 23 (1989): 301–07.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wells, H. G. World Brain. London: Methuen. 1938.Google Scholar
Wiberley, Stephen E. Jr.Habits of Humanists: Scholarly Behavior and New Information Technologies.” Library HiTech 9(1999): 1721.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Library versus the Internet: Literary Studies under Siege?
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The Library versus the Internet: Literary Studies under Siege?
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The Library versus the Internet: Literary Studies under Siege?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *