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Molecular characterization of Vigna marina (Burm.f.) Merr. from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands for salt tolerance using SSR markers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 October 2021

M. Prithivi
Affiliation:
Department of Biotechnology, Kumaraguru College of Technology, Coimbatore641 049, Tamil Nadu, India
K. Venkatesan*
Affiliation:
ICAR-Central Island Agricultural Research Institute, Port Blair744 101, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India
D. R. Manimaran
Affiliation:
Department of Biotechnology, Kumaraguru College of Technology, Coimbatore641 049, Tamil Nadu, India
R. K. Gautam
Affiliation:
ICAR-Central Island Agricultural Research Institute, Port Blair744 101, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India
P. K. Singh
Affiliation:
ICAR-Central Island Agricultural Research Institute, Port Blair744 101, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India
K. Sakthivel
Affiliation:
ICAR-Indian Institute of Oilseeds Research, Hyderabad500 030, Telangana, India
S. K. Zamir Ahmed
Affiliation:
ICAR-Central Island Agricultural Research Institute, Port Blair744 101, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India
S. K. Pandey
Affiliation:
ICAR-Central Island Agricultural Research Institute, Port Blair744 101, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India
Shyam Sunder Rao
Affiliation:
ICAR-Central Island Agricultural Research Institute, Port Blair744 101, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India
*
Author for correspondence: K. Venkatesan, E-mail: venkipgr08@gmail.com

Abstract

Beachpea (Vigna marina) is a halophytic wild leguminous plant which occurs throughout tropical and subtropical beaches of world. As quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for salt tolerance in V. marina and its crossability with other Vigna species are known, the current study was undertaken to know the presence of these QTLs in the V. marina accessions along with check varieties of pulses. Accordingly, 20 Vigna genotypes (15 accessions of V. marina collected from sea-shore areas of Andaman and Nicobar Islands along with five check varieties of green gram and black gram) were subjected to molecular characterization using seven simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers associated with salt tolerance. Of the markers used, only four SSR markers amplified in the studied germplasm. Number of alleles detected per primer and size of alleles ranged from 1 to 3 and 100 to 325 bp, respectively. Polymorphism information content and heterozygosity values ranged from 0.305 to 0.537 and 0.375 to 0.612, respectively. Three major clusters, cluster I, II and III were obtained at Jaccard's similarity coefficient value of 0.48 through the un-weighted paired group method with arithmetic means method of cluster analysis. It grouped green gram and black gram genotypes in clusters I (04) and II (01), whereas all V. marina genotypes were grouped in cluster III (15). Principal co-ordinate analysis explained 85.9% of genetic variation among genotypes which was further confirmed by cluster analysis. This study indicated the effectiveness of SSR markers in separating cultivated Vigna species from wild V. marina. The findings will be useful for transferring trait of robust salt tolerance of V. marina in cultivated Vigna species using marker-assisted breeding.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of NIAB

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Molecular characterization of Vigna marina (Burm.f.) Merr. from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands for salt tolerance using SSR markers
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