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David Bond and Jean Picard: Two pivotal breeders of faba bean in the 20th century

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2018

Gerard Duc
Affiliation:
UMR 1347 Agroécologie, AgroSup/INRA/uBFC, 17 rue de Sully, BP 86510, F-21000 Dijon, France
Fred Stoddard*
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Viikki Plant Science Centre, University of Helsinki, PO Box 27 (Latokartanonkaari 5-7), Fin-00014Finland
*
*Corresponding author. Email: Frederick.stoddard@helsinki.fi

Abstract

David Bond and Jean Picard, two leaders of European legume breeding, died within a few months of each other. On the basis of their agronomic and genetic training, they both met the challenge of breeding faba bean, a protein-rich species that had received little attention from breeders before the 1950s (Picard, 1953; Bond 1957). Both made great strides at modernizing their chosen crop by developing and applying new ideas and techniques, as well as generating new methods and genetic materials.

Type
Short Communication
Copyright
Copyright © NIAB 2018 

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References

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