Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-jtg5s Total loading time: 0.202 Render date: 2021-09-19T13:57:28.959Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Characterization and genetic potential of African pearl millet named landraces conserved at the ICRISAT genebank

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 April 2016

H. D. Upadhyaya*
Affiliation:
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Genebank, Patancheru, Telangana 502 324, India Department of Agronomy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA UWA Institute of Agriculture, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
K. N. Reddy
Affiliation:
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Genebank, Patancheru, Telangana 502 324, India
M. Irshad Ahmed
Affiliation:
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Genebank, Patancheru, Telangana 502 324, India
Senthil Ramachandran
Affiliation:
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Genebank, Patancheru, Telangana 502 324, India
Vinod Kumar
Affiliation:
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Genebank, Patancheru, Telangana 502 324, India
Sube Singh
Affiliation:
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Genebank, Patancheru, Telangana 502 324, India
*Corresponding
*Corresponding author. E-mail: H.Upadhyaya@cgiar.org

Abstract

The world collection of pearl millet at ICRISAT genebank includes 19,696 landraces. Passport and characterization data of 2,929 accessions belonging to 89 named landraces originating in 15 countries of Africa was used to study the adoption pattern and genetic potential. Out of 89 named landraces under study, 71 were grown in one country, 11 in two countries, six in three countries and one in four countries. Latitude and prevailing climate at collection sites were found as the important determinants of cultivation pattern of landraces. A hierarchical cluster analysis using 12 agronomic traits resulted in five clusters. Cluster 1 for late flowering, short height in rainy season, high tillering and thin panicles; cluster 2 for early flowering; cluster 3 for stout panicles in both the seasons and larger seeds and cluster 5 for longer panicles in both seasons, were found as promising sources. IP 8957, IP 8958, IP 8964 of Iniadi landrace for short height, downy mildew and rust resistance and high seed iron and zinc contents; IP 17521 of Gnali (106.9 ppm) and IP 11523 of Idiyouwe (106.5 ppm) for high seed iron content; IP 17518 of Gnali (79.1 ppm) and IP 11535 of Iniadi (78.4 ppm) for high seed zinc content were the important sources. All accessions of Raa for high seed protein content (>15%) and those of Enele for drought tolerance, were found to be promising sources. Further evaluation of promising sources identified in this study is needed for enhanced utilization of germplasm in pearl millet improvement.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © NIAB 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Andrews, DJ and Anand Kumar, K (1996) Use of the West African pearl millet landrace Iniadi in cultivar development. Plant Genetic Resources Newsletter 105: 1522.Google Scholar
Bidinger, FR, Mahalakshmi, V and Rao, GDP (1987) Assessment of drought resistance in pearl millet [Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke]. I. Factors affecting yield under stress. Australian Journal of Agriculture Research 38: 3748.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bidinger, FR, Sharma, MM and Yadav, OP (2008) Performance of landraces and hybrids of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.) under good management in the arid zone. Indian Journal of Genetics and Plant Breeding 68: 146148.Google Scholar
CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Cereals (2014) Pearl Millet Impacts. Patancheru, Telangana, India: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT).Google ScholarPubMed
Cleveland, DA, Soleri, D and Smith, SE (1994) Do folk crop varieties have a role in sustainable agriculture? BioScience 44: 740751.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Curtis, DL (1968) The relation between yield and date of heading of Nigerian sorghums. Experimental Agriculture 4: 93101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dwivedi, SL, Upadhyaya, HD, Senthilvel, S, Hash, CT, Fukunaga, K, Xiamin, D, Dipak, S, Baltensperger, D and Prasad, M (2012) Millets: genetic and genomic resources. In: Janick, J (ed.) Plant Breeding Reviews, 1st edn, vol. 35. Hoboken, New Jersey, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, Published by Jhon Wiley & Sons, Inc.Google Scholar
Dwivedi, SL, Ceccarelli, S, Blair, MW, Upadhyaya, HD, Ashok, KA and Ortiz, R (2016) Landrace germplasm for improving yield and abiotic stress adaptation. Trends in Plant Science 21: 3142.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Erskine, E (1997) Lessons for breeders from landraces of lentil. Euphytica 93: 107112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Escribano, MR, Santalla, M, Casquero, PA and De Ron, AM (1998) Patterns of genetic diversity in landraces of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Galicia. Plant Breeding 117: 4956.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fussel, LK, Bidinger, FR and Bieler, P (1991) Crop physiology and breeding for drought tolerance: research and development. Field Crops Research 27: 183199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gemechu, K, Endashaw, B, Imtiaz, M and Dagne, K (2012) Genetic vulnerability of modern crop cultivars: causes, mechanism and remedies. International Journal of Plant Research 2: 6979.Google Scholar
Hash, CT, Bhasker Raj, AG, Appa Rao, S and Singh, U (1997) New sources of yellow endosperm and ß-carotene in pearl millet. [Abstract of poster presentation] In: Proceedings of the International Conference of Genetic Improvement of Sorghum and Pearl Millet, 22–27 September 1996, Holiday Inn Plaza, Lubbock, Texas. Lincoln, NE, USA: INTSORMIL, p. 650.Google Scholar
Haussmann, BIG, Boubacar, A, Boureima, SS and Vigouroux, Y (2006) Multiplication and preliminary characterization of West and Central African pearl millet landraces. International Sorghum and Millets Newsletter 47: 110112.Google Scholar
Hijmans, RJ, Cameron, SE, Parra, JL, Jones, PG and Jarvis, A (2005) Very high resolution interpolated climate surfaces for global land areas. International Journal of Climatology 25: 19651978. doi: 10.1002/joc.1276. Available at http://www.worldclim.org/current in June 2011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
IBPGR and ICRISAT (1993) Descriptors for Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.]. Rome, Italy: International Board for Plant Genetic Resources, and Patancheru, India: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, p. 43.Google Scholar
IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development) (1999) Farmer participatory testing of technologies to increase sorghum and pearl millet production in the Sahel. Available at http://www.ifad.org/grants.Google Scholar
Keuls, M (1952) The use of the “Studentized range” in connection with an analysis of variance. Euphytica 1: 112122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kowal, JM and Kassam, AH (1978) Agricultural Ecology of Savanna. A Study of West Africa. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press, p. 403.Google Scholar
Levene, H (1960) Robust tests for equality of variances. In: Olkin, I (ed.) Contributions to Probability and Statistics: Essays in Honour of Harold Hotelling. Stanford: Stanford University Press, pp. 278292.Google Scholar
Mansholt, UJ (1909) Van Pesch Plantenteelt, beknote handleiding tot de kennis van den Nederlandschen landbouw, 3rd revised edn, pt 2. Zwolle: Plantenteelt, 228 pp.Google Scholar
MS EncartaR Interactive World Atlas (2000) 1995–1999 Microsoft Corporation. Redmond, WA: One Microsoft Way, pp. 98052106399.Google Scholar
Newman, D (1939) The distribution of range in samples from a normal population expressed in terms of an independent estimate of standard deviation. Biometrika 31: 2030.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Newton, AC, Akar, T, Baresel, JP, Rebeli, PJ, Bettencourt, E, Bladenopoulos, KV, Czembor, JH, Fasoula, DA, Katsiotis, A, Koutis, K, Koutsika-Sotiriou, M, Kovacs, G, Larsson, H, Pinheiro de Carvalho, MAA, Rubiales, D, Russell, J, Dos Santos, TMM and Vaz Patto, MC (2010) Cereal landraces for sustainable agriculture. A review. Agronomy for Sustainable Development 30: 237269.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ong, CK (1983) Response to temperature in a stand of pearl millet (Pennisetum typhoides S & H):II. Reproductive development. Journal of Experimental Botany 34: 337348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Patra, BC (2000) Collection and characterization of rice genetic resources from Keonjhar district of Orissa. Oryza 34: 324326.Google Scholar
Pearson, CJ and Coaldrake, PD (1983) Pennisetum americanum as a grain crop in eastern Australia. Field Crops Research 7: 265282.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Quendeba, B, Ejeta, G, Hanna, WW and Kumar, KA (1995) Diversity among African pearl millet landrace populations. Crop Science 35: 919924.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rai, KN, Hash, CT, Singh, AK and Velu, G (2008) Adaptation and quality traits of a germplasm derived commercial seed parent of pearl millet. Plant Genetic Resources Newsletter 154: 2024.Google Scholar
Rai, KN, Velu, G, Govindraj, M, Upadhyaya, HD, Rao, AS, Shivade, H and Reddy, KN (2015) Iniadi pearl millet germplasm as a valuable genetic resource for high grain iron and zinc densities. Plant Genetic Resources: Characterization and Utilization 13: 7582.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reddy, KN, Rao, K and Irshad Ahmed, B (2004) Geographical patterns of diversity in pearl millet germplasm from Yemen. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution 51: 513517.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Richharia, RH (1979) An aspect of genetic diversity in Rice. Oryza 16: 131.Google Scholar
Sahrawat, KL (2002a) Sulfuric acid-selenium digestion for multi-element analysis in a single plant digest. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis 33: 37573765.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sahrawat, KL (2002b) Sulfuric acid-selenium digestion for multi-element analysis in a single plant digest. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis 33: 95102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shannon, CE and Weaver, W (1949) The Mathematical Theory of Communication. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.Google Scholar
Sharma, R, Upadhyaya, HD, Manjunatha, SV, Rai, KN, Gupta, SK and Thakur, RP (2013) Pathogenic variation in the pearl millet blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea and identification of resistance to diverse pathotypes. Plant Disease 97: 189195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singh, SD, Wilson, JP, Navi, SS, Talukdar, BS, Hess, DE and Reddy, KN (1997) Screening Techniques and Sources of Resistance to Downy Mildew and Rust in Pearl Millet. (In: En. Summaries in En, Fr, Es.). Information Bulletin no. 48. Patancheru, AP, India: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, 36 pp. ISBN 92-9066-352-9.Google Scholar
Tania, CCV, Maxted, N, Scholten, M and Liod, BF (2005) Defining and identifying crop landraces. Plant Genetic Resources: Characterization and Utilization 3: 373384.Google Scholar
Thakur, RP, Williams, RJ and Rao, VP (1982) Development of ergot resistance in pearl millet. Phytopathology 72: 406408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thakur, RP, Rai, KN, King, SB and Rao, VP (1993) Identification and Utilization of Ergot Resistance in Pearl Millet. (In: En. Summaries in En. Fr. Es.) Research Bulletin no. 17. Patancheru, AP, India: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, 40 pp. ISBN 92-9066-281-6.Google Scholar
Tostain, S (1994) Isozymic classification of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum, Poaceae) landraces from Niger (West Africa). Plant Systematics and Evolution 193: 8193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Upadhyaya, HD and Gowda, CLL (2009) Managing and Enhancing the Use of Germplasm – Strategies and Methodologies. Technical Manual no.10. Patancheru, AP, India: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, 236 pp.Google Scholar
Upadhyaya, HD, Reddy, KN, Gowda, CLL, Irshad Ahmed, M and Singh, S (2007) Agroecological patterns of diversity in pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.] germplasm from India. Indian Journal of Plant Genetic Resources 20: 178185.Google Scholar
Upadhyaya, HD, Reddy, KN, Irshad Ahmed, M, Gowda, CLL and Bettina, H (2009) Identification of geographical gaps in the pearl millet germplasm conserved at ICRISAT genebank from West and Central Africa. Plant Genetic Resources: Characterization and Utilization 8: 4551.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Upadhyaya, HD, Reddy, KN, Irshad Ahmed, M, Dronavalli, N and Gowda, CLL (2012a) Latitudinal variation and distribution of photoperiod and temperature sensitivity for flowering in the world collection of pearl millet germplasm at ICRISAT genebank. Plant Genetic Resources: Characterization and Utilization 10: 5969.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Upadhyaya, HD, Reddy, KN, Irshad Ahmed, M and Gowda, CLL (2012b) Identification of gaps in pearl millet germplasm from East and Southern Africa conserved at the ICRISAT genebank. Plant Genetic Resources: Characterization and Utilization 10: 202213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Upadhyaya, HD, Reddy, KN, Singh, S, Gowda, CLL, Irshad Ahmed, M and Ramachandran, S (2014) Latitudinal patterns of diversity in the world collection of pearl millet landraces at the ICRISAT genebank. Plant Genetic Resources: Characterization and Utilization 12: 91102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
VSN International (2010) GenStat Software for Windows. Release 13.1. Hemel Hempstead, UK: VSN International Ltd.Google Scholar
Ward, JH (1963) Hierarchical grouping to optimize an objective function. Journal of American Statistical Association 58: 236244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wareing, PF and Phillips, IDJ (1981) Growth and Differentiation in Plants, 3rd edn. Oxford, UK: Pergamon Press, 353 pp.Google ScholarPubMed
Wilson, JP, Burton, GW, Wells, HD, Zongo, JD and Dicko, IO (1989) Leaf spot, rust and smut resistance in pearl millet landraces from Central Burkina Faso. Plant Disease 73: 345349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yadav, OP (2010) Drought response of pearl millet landrace-based populations and their crosses with elite composites. Field Crops Research 118: 5156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yadav, OP and Bidinger, FR (2007) Utilization, diversification and improvement of landraces for enhancing pearl millet productivity in arid environments. Annals of Arid Zone 46: 4957.Google Scholar
Yadav, OP and Rai, KN (2013) Genetic improvement of pearl millet in India. Agriculture Research 2: 275292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yadav, OP, Weltzien–Rattunde, E and Bidinger, FR (2003) Genetic variation for drought response among landraces of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum). Indian Journal of Genetics and Plant Breeding 63: 3740.Google Scholar
Supplementary material: Image

Upadhyaya supplementary material

Figure S1

Download Upadhyaya supplementary material(Image)
Image 230 KB
Supplementary material: File

Upadhyaya supplementary material

Tables S1-S3

Download Upadhyaya supplementary material(File)
File 412 KB
4
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Characterization and genetic potential of African pearl millet named landraces conserved at the ICRISAT genebank
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Characterization and genetic potential of African pearl millet named landraces conserved at the ICRISAT genebank
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Characterization and genetic potential of African pearl millet named landraces conserved at the ICRISAT genebank
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *