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Eli Berman and David Laitin

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 February 2007

Eli Berman
Affiliation:
University of California at San Diego
David Laitin
Affiliation:
Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University

Extract

The three books under review reflect a radically altered agenda in social science, affected by the attacks of September 11, 2001, in which international terrorism in general and suicide missions in particular are “hot” topics. But because (sadly) new cases are recorded daily, the analyses in these books must be considered exploratory.Eli Berman is professor of economics at the University of California at San Diego. David D. Laitin is James T. Watkins IV and Elise V. Watkins Professor of Political Science and an affiliated faculty member of the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University.

Type
REVIEW SYMPOSIUM: UNDERSTANDING SUICIDE TERROR
Copyright
© 2007 American Political Science Association

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References

Berman, Eli. 2003. “Hamas, Taliban and the Jewish Underground: An Economist's View of Radical Religious Militias.” National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Working Paper 10004.
Berman, Eli, and David D. Laitin. 2005. “Hard Targets: Theory and Evidence on Suicide Attacks.” NBER Working Paper 11740.
Berman, Eli, and Ara Stepanyan. 2003. “How Many Radical Islamists? Indirect Evidence from Five Countries.” University of California at San Diego mimeograph.
Chen, Daniel. 2005. “Club Goods and Group Identity: Evidence from Islamic Resurgence During the Indonesian Financial Crisis.” University of Chicago mimeograph.
Combating Terrorism Center. 2006. “Harmony and Disharmony: Exploiting al-Qa'ida's Organizational Vulnerabilities.” U.S. Military Academy mimeograph, February.
Crenshaw, Martha. 1990. “The Logic of Terrorism: Terrorist Behavior as a Product of Strategic Choice.” In Origins of Terrorism: Psychologies, Ideologies, Theologies, States of Mind, ed. Walter Reich. Washington, DC: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 724.
Dichter, Avi, and Daniel L. Byman. 2006. “Israel's Lessons for Fighting Terrorists and Their Lessons for the United States.” Brookings Institution, March.
Enders, Walter, and Todd Sandler. 2002. “Patterns of Transnational Terrorism, 1970–1999: Alternative Time-Series Estimates.” International Studies Quarterly 46 (2): 14566.Google Scholar
Fearon, James D., and David D. Laitin. 2003. “Ethnicity, Insurgency, and Civil War.” American Political Science Review 97 (1): 7590.Google Scholar
Fearon, James D., and David D. Laitin. 2004. “Neotrusteeship and the Problem of Weak States.” International Security 28 (4): 543.Google Scholar
Iannaccone, Laurence R. 1992. “Sacrifice and Stigma: Reducing Free-riding in Cults, Communes, and Other Collectives.” Journal of Political Economy 100 (2): 27191.Google Scholar
Kalyvas, Stathis. 2006. The Logic of Violence in Civil War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Krueger, Alan B. 2006. “The National Origins of Foreign Fighters in Iraq.” Paper presented to the National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, MA, July 25.
Kydd, Andrew, and Barbara F. Walter. 2002. “Sabotaging the Peace: The Politics of Extremist Violence.” International Organization 56 (2): 26396.Google Scholar
Laitin, David D., and Jacob Shapiro. Forthcoming. “The Political, Economic and Organizational Sources of Terrorism.” Paper prepared for the World Bank Project on Security and Development.
Mishal, Shaul, and Avraham Sela. 2000. The Palestinian Hamas: Vision, Violence, and Coexistence. New York: Columbia University Press.
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