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Article contents

Trypanosome infections and survival in tsetse

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 March 2011

I. Maudlin
Affiliation:
Tsetse Research Group, Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Anderson College, 56 Dumbarton Road, Glasgow G11 6NU, UK
S. C. Welburn
Affiliation:
Tsetse Research Group, Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Anderson College, 56 Dumbarton Road, Glasgow G11 6NU, UK
P. J. M. Milligan
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council Laboratories, Fajara, P.O. Box 273, Banjul, The Gambia

Summary

The effect of trypanosome infection on vector survival was observed in a line of Glossina morsitans morsitans selected for susceptibility to trypanosome infection. The differential effects of midgut and salivary gland infections on survival were examined by exposing flies to infection with either Trypanosoma congolense which colonizes midgut and mouthparts or Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense which colonizes midgut and salivary glands. A comparison of the survival distributions of uninfected flies with those exposed to infection showed that salivary gland infection significantly reduces tsetse survival; midgut infection had little or no effect on the survival of tsetse. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to the vectorial capacity of wild flies.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1998

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