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Gastroenteric parasite of wild Galliformes in the Italian Alps: implication for conservation management

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 December 2019

A. Fanelli
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10090 – Grugliasco (Turin), Italy
G. Menardi
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10090 – Grugliasco (Turin), Italy
M. Chiodo
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10090 – Grugliasco (Turin), Italy
O. Giordano
Affiliation:
Comprensorio Alpino CN2 “Valle Varaita”, Valle Varaita, Italy
G. Ficetto
Affiliation:
Comprensorio Alpino CN2 “Valle Varaita”, Valle Varaita, Italy
M. Bessone
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10090 – Grugliasco (Turin), Italy
A. Lasagna
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10090 – Grugliasco (Turin), Italy
M.G. Carpignano
Affiliation:
Comprensorio Alpino CN3 “Valli Maira e Grana”, Valli Maira e Grana, Italy
A. Molinar Min
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10090 – Grugliasco (Turin), Italy
A. Gugiatti
Affiliation:
Comprensorio Alpino “Sondrio”, Sondrio, Italy
P.G. Meneguz
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10090 – Grugliasco (Turin), Italy
P. Tizzani*
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, 10090 – Grugliasco (Turin), Italy
*Corresponding
Author for correspondence: Paolo Tizzani, E-mail: paolo.tizzani@unito.it

Abstract

This study provides insights about the diversity, prevalence and distribution of alpine wild galliformes gastrointestinal parasite community, trying to fill a gap in the scientific information currently available in scientific literature. The analysis included three host species: 77 rock partridge (Alectoris graeca saxatilis), 83 black grouse (Tetrao tetrix tetrix) and 26 rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta helveticus) shot during the hunting seasons 2008–2015. Parasites isolated were Ascaridia compar, Capillaria caudinflata and cestodes. The rock ptarmigan was free from gastrointestinal parasites, whereas the most prevalent helminth (37%) was A. compar in both black grouse and rock partridge. C. caudinflata occurrence was significantly higher in black grouse (prevalence = 10%, mean abundance = 0.6 parasites/sampled animal) than in rock partridge (prevalence = 1.20%, mean abundance = 0.01 parasites/sampled animal). Significant differences were detected among hunting districts. A. compar was found with a significant higher degree of infestation in the hunting districts in the northern part of the study area whereas cestodes abundance was higher in Lanzo Valley. Quantitative analysis of risk factors was carried out using a generalized linear model (GLM) only on the most common parasite (A. compar). Latitude was the only factors associated with infestation risk (OR = 52.4). This study provides information on the composition and variability of the parasite community in the alpine Galliformes species.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019

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Footnotes

*

These authors equally contribute to the paper.

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