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Article contents

Gaps in our armoury against parasites of man

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009

G. H. Rée
Affiliation:
Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London

Extract

The major health problems of the world today relate to infections—viral, bacterial or parasitological. Malaria, schistosomiasis and filariasis are a risk to at least 600 million people and the problems of many of these infections are getting worse owing to ecological changes associated with industrial development and burgeoning populations which have increased out of proportion to increases in health resources.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

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References

Opperdoes, F. R., (1983). Towards the development of new drugs for parasitic disease. In Parasitology, a Global Prospective (ed. Warren, K. S. and Bowers, J. Z.), pp. 191200. New York: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
Portnoy, D., Whiteside, M. E., Buckley, E., & MacLeod, C. L., (1984). Treatment of intestinal cryptosporidiosis with spiramycin. Annals of Internal Medicine 101, 202–4.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
World Health Organization (1977). The selection of essential drugs. WHO Technical Report Series. no. 615.Google Scholar
World Health Organization (1983). The use of essential drugs. WHO Technical Report Series, no. 685.Google Scholar

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