Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-dkqnh Total loading time: 0.165 Render date: 2021-10-23T09:15:17.680Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

The excystation of Entamoeba histolytica without bacteria in microcultures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 April 2009

Charles W. Rees
Affiliation:
From the Laboratory of Tropical Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
Lucy V. Reardon
Affiliation:
From the Laboratory of Tropical Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
Ida Louise Bartgis
Affiliation:
From the Laboratory of Tropical Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

Extract

1. Formulae developed by Anfinsen et al. (1946) for a medium used in the cultivation of Plasmodium knowlesi were used for media in which excystation of Entamoeba histolytica without bacteria was investigated.

2. The following media were used: (i) an inorganic fluid containing carbon dioxide and chlorides, phosphates, and bicarbonates, of sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium; (ii) an inorganic fluid of chlorides and phosphates of the above metals without bicarbonates; (iii) the same respective fluids plus glucose, and (iv) the same plus enrichments with B vitamins, cocarboxylase, vitamin C, purines, pyrimidines, folic acid, glucosamine, cholesterol, and amino-acids. The oxygen content of all media was lowered either by cysteine or glutathione.

3. Some excystation occurred in all media, the percentages were lowest in the inorganic fluid without bicarbonates, highest in fluid with bicarbonates plus all of the listed organic compounds, and intermediate in the inorganic bicarbonate fluid plus glucose. Amino-acids were not required for good percentages of excystation.

4. Excystation occurred when cysts were isolated in medium with Trypanosoma cruzi.

5. The data show that organic compounds in the medium are necessary for high percentages of excystation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1950

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anfinsen, C. B., Geiman, Q. M., McKee, R. W., Obmsbee, B. A. & Ball, E. G. (1946). Studies on malarial parasites. VIII. Factors affecting the growth of Plasmodium, knowlesi in vitro. J. Exp. Med. 84, 607.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bayliss, W. M. (1924). Principles of General Physiology. London: Longmans, Green and Co.Google Scholar
Cleveland, L. R. & Sanders, E. P. (1930 a). The production of bacteria-free amoebic abscesses in the liver of eats and observations on the amoebae in various media with and without bacteria. Science, 72, 149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cleveland, L. R. & Sanders, E. P. (1930 b). Encystation, multiple fission without encystment, excystation, metacystic development, and variation in a pure line and nine strains of Entamoeba histolytica. Arch. Protistenk. 70, 223.Google Scholar
Dobell, C. (1927). Further observations and experiments on the cultivation of Entamoeba histolytica from cysts. Parasitology, 19, 288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dobell, C. (1928). Researches on the intestinal protozoa of monkeys and man. I. General introduction. II. Description of the whole life-history of Entamoeba histolytica in cultures. Parasitology, 20, 357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dobell, C. (1931). IV. An experimental study of the histolytica-like species of Entamoeba living naturally in macaques. Parasitology, 23, 1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dobell, C. & Laidlaw, P. P. (1926). On the cultivation of Entamoeba histolytica and some other entozoic amoebae. Parasitology, 18, 283.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eulek, H., von Nilsson, R. & Auhagen, E. (1931). Ueber die Function des Magnesiums beim enzymatischen Kohlenhydratbau. Hoppe-Seyl. Z. 200, 2.Google Scholar
Faust, E. C. (1940). The carrier races of Endamoeba histolytica in a New Orleans Children's Institution. J. Parasit. Supp. 26, 21.Google Scholar
Meleney, H. E., Frye, W. W., Leathers, W. S. & Snyder, T. L. (1940). The sterilization of the cysts of Endamoeba histolytica, with preliminary observations on subsequent excystation. Proc. 3rd Int. Congr. Microbiol, p. 410.Google Scholar
Phillips, B. P. (1950). The cultivation of Endamoeba histolytica with Trypanosoma cruzi. Science, 111, 8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Porter, J. R. (1947). Bacterial Chemistry and Physiology. London: John Wiley and Sons.Google Scholar
Quastel, J. H. & Webley, D. M. (1942). Vitamin B1 and bacterial oxidations. 2. The effects of magnesium, potassium, and hexose diphosphate ions. Biochem. J. 36, 8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rees, C. W. (1942). The construction of a micromanipulator for the isolation of protozoa. Amer. J. Trop. Med. 22, 487.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rees, C. W., Reardon, H. D. & Baeknstein, L. V. (1948). A biochemical approach to the problem of cultivating Endamoeba histolytica without bacteria. J. Parasitol. 34 (Sec. 2), 11.Google Scholar
Rees, C. W. & Reardon, L. V., Jones, F. E., Griffin, A. M. (1947). Observations on the excystation of Endamoeba histolytica. J. Parasit. 33, 385.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Snyder, T. L. & Meleney, H. E. (1941). The excystation of Endamoeba histolytica in bacteriologically sterile media. Amer. J. Trop. Med. 21, 63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stephenson, M. (1949). Bacterial Metabolism, 3rd ed.London: Longmans, Green and Co.Google Scholar
Sttmner, J. B. & Somers, G. F. (1947). Chemistry and Methods of Enzymes. New York: Academic Press Inc.Google Scholar
Yorke, W. & Adams, A. R. D. (1926). Observations on Entamoeba histolytica. I. Development of cysts, excystation, and development of excysted amoebae in vitro. Ann. Trop. Med. Parasit. 20, 279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The excystation of Entamoeba histolytica without bacteria in microcultures
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The excystation of Entamoeba histolytica without bacteria in microcultures
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The excystation of Entamoeba histolytica without bacteria in microcultures
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *