Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-b6fb2 Total loading time: 0.256 Render date: 2021-09-26T02:10:53.920Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Natural Selection and Evolutionary Change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2017

Kevin Padian*
Affiliation:
Department of Integrative Biology and Museum of Paleontology, University of California Berkeley, California 94720-3140
Get access

Extract

In modern biology, natural selection is widely treated as the central mechanism of evolution. Darwin built his greatest book on it; largely ignored for the latter part of the 19th Century, its centrality was restored during the Modern Synthesis of the 1930s. Since then, its importance has sometimes been exaggerated into claims that selection drives adaptation toward optimality. Its effects have been studied in captive and wild populations of all sorts of organisms, and in past as well as present biotas. But it has also been downplayed as only one of many factors of evolutionary change, an editor with no creative force, incapable of guiding any real change in lineages. Natural selection is as intrinsic to ecological theory as to evolutionary theory, and links the two fields as few other concepts do. But like nearly all population processes, its effects on evolution in the long run remain an open question, difficult to test directly.

Type
Mechanisms of Evolution
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by The Paleontological Society 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Andrewartha, H.G., and Birch, L.C. 1954. The Distribution and Abundance of Animals. University of Chicago Press, Chicago. 782 pp.Google Scholar
Benton, M.J. 1996. On the nonprevalence of competitive replacement in the evolution of tetrapods, p. 185210. In Jablonski, D., Erwin, D. H., and Lipps, J.H. (eds.), Evolutionary Paleobiology: Essays in honor of James W. Valentine. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
Bonner, J.T., and May, R.M. 1981. Introduction, p. xiixxxiii. In Darwin, C., The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. [Facsimile reprint, 1981.] Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.Google Scholar
Brooks, D.R., and McLennan, D.A. 1991. Phylogeny, Ecology, and Behavior. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
Burkhardt, R.W. 1977. The Spirit of System: Lamarck and evolutionary biology. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cope, E. D. 1887. The Origin of the Fittest: Essays on evolution. Appleton, New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corsi, P. 1988. The Age of Lamarck: Evolutionary theories in France, 1790-1830. University of California Press, Berkeley.Google Scholar
Darwin, C. 1859. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. John Murray, London.Google Scholar
Darwin, C. 1872. The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. Volume 1. John Murray, London, xxx pp.Google Scholar
Darwin, C., and Wallace, A. 1859. On the tendency of species to form varieties; and on the perpetuation of varieties and species by natural means of selection. Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society (Zoology) 3: 4562.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Desmond, A.J., and Moore, J. 1991. Darwin. Warner Books, New York.Google ScholarPubMed
Ellegård, A. 1958. Darwin and the General Reader . Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis 64: 1394. Reprinted 1990, University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London.Google Scholar
Gould, S.J., and Vrba, E.S. 1982. Exaptation — a missing term in the science of form. Paleobiology 8: 415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Greene, H.W. 1986. Diet and arboreality in the emerald monitor, Varanus prasinus, with comments on the study of adaptation. Fieldiana 1370: 112.Google Scholar
Harvey, P.H., and Pagel, M.D. 1991. The Comparative Method in Evolutionary Biology. Oxford University Press, New York.Google Scholar
Hull, D.L. 1983. Darwin and his Critics: The reception of Darwin's theory of evolution by the scientific community. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
MacFadden, B.J. 1992. Fossil Horses. Cambridge University Press, New York. 369 pp.Google ScholarPubMed
Malthus, T.R. [Anonymous]. 1798. An essay on the principle of population as it affects the future improvement of society: with remarks on the speculations of Mr. Godwin, M. Condorcet and other writers. J. Johnson, London.Google Scholar
Mayr, E., and Provine, W.B. 1980. The Evolutionary Synthesis: Perspectives on the unification of biology. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 487 pp.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moorhead, P.S., and Kaplan, M. M. (eds.). 1967. Mathematical Challenges to the Neo-Darwinian Interpretation of Evolution. Wistar Institute Symposium Monograph 5, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
Padian, K. 1987. A comparative phylogenetic and functional approach to the origin of vertebrate flight. p. 322. In Fenton, B., Pacey, P.A., and Rayner, J.M.V. (eds.), Recent Advances in the Study of Bats. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England.Google Scholar
Padian, K. 1995. Form versus function: the evolution of a dialectic, p. 264277. In Thomason, J.J. (ed.), Functional Morphology in Vertebrate Paleontology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England.Google Scholar
Rose, M.R., and Lauder, G.V. 1996. Adaptation. Academic Press, San Diego, California. 511 pp.Google ScholarPubMed
Sampson, S.D. 1995a. Two new horned dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of Montana; with a phylogenetic analysis of the Centrosaurinae (Ornithischia: Ceratopsidae). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 15: 743760.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sampson, S.D. 1995b. Horns, herds, and hierarchies. Natural History 104 (6): 3640.Google Scholar
Stanley, S.M. 1975. A theory of evolution above the species level. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 72: 646650.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Valen, L. 1973. A new evolutionary law. Evolutionary Theory 1(1): 130.Google Scholar
Vermeij, G.J. 1987. Evolution and Escalation: An ecological history of life. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.Google Scholar
Vickaryous, M.K., and Ryan, M.J. 1997. Ornamentation, p. 488493. In Currie, P.J. and Padian, K. (eds.), Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs. Academic Press, San Diego, California.Google Scholar
Vrba, E.S., and Gould, S.J. 1986. The hierarchical expansion of sorting and selection: sorting and selection cannot be equated. Paleobiology 12: 217228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weiner, J. 1995. The Beak of the finch. Alfred A. Knopf, New York.Google Scholar
Williams, G.C. 1966. Adaptation and Natural Selection: A critique of some current evolutionary thought. Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J. Google Scholar
Williams, G.C. 1997. The Pony Fish's Glow, and other clues to plan and purpose in nature. Basic Books, New York.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Natural Selection and Evolutionary Change
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Natural Selection and Evolutionary Change
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Natural Selection and Evolutionary Change
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *