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Basic guidelines for palynomorph extraction and preparation from sedimentary rocks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2017

Ronald J. Litwin
Affiliation:
U.S. Geological Survey and The Pennsylvania State University
Alfred Traverse
Affiliation:
U.S. Geological Survey and The Pennsylvania State University
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Extract

The term palynomorph generally includes the spores of lower vascular plants (isospores/homospores, and megaspores), prepollen, the pollen of gymnosperms and angiosperms, dinoflagellates, acritarchs, fungal spores, and algal remains. Chitinozoans, scolecodonts, and foraminiferal inner tests also are concentrated by palynological processing techniques, and some palynologists therefore include them as palynomorphs. These processes isolate any silt-sized or sand-sized acid-resistant organic-walled particles, however, and also will concentrate foraminiferal inner tests leaf cuticle, vascular debris from plants, chitinous insect parts, etc., which usually are not considered palynomorphs. All of the above are recovered, definition notwithstanding.

Type
Techniques for Micropaleontology
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 Paleontological Society 

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References

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