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The Intake of Selected Minerals and Trace Elements in European Countries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 December 2007

W Van Dokkum
Affiliation:
TNO-Nutrition and Food Research, Zeist, The Netherlands (for members* of FLAIR Concerted Action No. 10: The measurement of micronutrient absorption and status)
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Abstract

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Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1995

References

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