Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-fg2fv Total loading time: 0.283 Render date: 2021-10-23T09:01:02.333Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Literature, revolution, and national aesthetics on the interwar Yugoslav left

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2018

James M. Robertson*
Affiliation:
Department of Politics and History, Woodbury University, Burbank, CA, USA. Email: james.robertson@woodbury.edu

Abstract

The interwar years are relatively understudied by intellectual historians of Eastern Europe. This is especially true of the study of the region's radical left-wing cultures, where attention has tended to focus on the Marxist revisionists of the post-war decades. As a period typically identified with political repression and economic crisis, the years following the end of World War I and the outbreak of World War II are assumed to hold little interest to the intellectual historian. However, throughout Eastern Europe, the 1920s and 1930s saw the growth of rich left-wing cultures that engaged with a diverse set of ideas from Western Europe and the Soviet Union, and adapted them to their local conditions. This article explores the development of leftist ideas during the interwar period by examining three prominent figures from Yugoslavia's literary left: the Croatian modernist Miroslav Krleža, the Montenegrin critical realist Milovan Đilas, and the Slovene Christian socialist Edvard Kocbek.

Type
Special Section: Representation of minorities: perspectives and challenges Guest Editors: Licia Cianetti and Jelena Lončar
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Association for the Study of Nationalities 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Avakumović, Ivan. 1964. History of the Communist Party of Yugoslavia. Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press.Google Scholar
Bihalji-Merin, Oto. 1959. The Art of Krsto Hegedušić. Belgrade: Jugoslavija.Google Scholar
Bogert, Ralph. 1990. The Writer as Naysayer: Miroslav Krleza and the Aesthetic of Interwar Central Europe. Bloomington, IN: Slavica.Google Scholar
Božović, Marijeta. 2013. “Zenit rising: Return to a Balkan Avant-garde.” In After Yugoslavia: The Cultural Spaces of a Vanished Land, edited by Gorup, Radmila, 135148. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cesarec, August. 2004. Sin domovine: životna drama Eugena Kvaternika. Zagreb: Dom i svijet.Google Scholar
Clissold, Stephen. 1983. Đilas: The Progress of a Revolutionary. New York, NY: Universe Books.Google Scholar
del Bayle, Jean-Louis Loubet. 1969. Les Non-conformistes des années 30: Une tentative de renouvellement de la pensée politique française. Paris: Editions du Seuil.Google Scholar
Dolenc, Ervin. 2003. “Kocbek's ‘Reflections on Spain': An Introduction.” Slovene Studies 25 (1–2): 4756.Google Scholar
Dragoš, Srečo. 1998. Katolicizem na Slovenskem: socialni koncepti do druge svetovne vojne. Ljubljana: Tiskarna Jože Moskrič.Google Scholar
Đilas, Aleksa. 1991. The Contested Country: Yugoslav Unity and Communist Revolution, 1919–1953. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Đilas, Milovan. 1959. Anatomy of a Moral: The Political Essays of Milovan Đilas. New York, NY: Praeger.Google Scholar
Đilas, Milovan. 1973. Memoir of a Revolutionary. New York, NY: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich.Google Scholar
Đilas, Milovan. 2000a. “Smrt hajduka Jovana.” In Rane pripovetke, 1930–1940, edited by Popović, Branko, 9195. Belgrade: S. Masić.Google Scholar
Đilas, Milovan. 2000b. “Student Mile mlekadžija.” In Rane pripovetke, 1930–1940, edited by Popović, Branko, 141146. Belgrade: S. Masić.Google Scholar
Đilas, Milovan. 2009a. “Misao Jovana Dučića.” In Problemi naše književnost, edited by Vojinović, Vladimir, 5572. Cetinje: Crnogorsko društvo nezavisnih književnika.Google Scholar
Đilas, Milovan. 2009b. “Kulturni nivo Sandžaka.” In Problemi naše književnost, edited by Vojinović, Vladimir, 2528. Cetinje: Crnogorsko društvo nezavisnih književnika.Google Scholar
Đilas, Milovan. 2009c. “Problemi naše književnost.” In Problemi naše književnost, edited by Vojinović, Vladimir, 124130. Cetinje: Crnogorsko društvo nezavisnih književnika.Google Scholar
Đilas, Milovan. 2009d. “Bjeleške o Njegošu.” In Problemi naše književnost, edited by Vojinović, Vladimir, 133139. Cetinje: Crnogorsko društvo nezavisnih književnika.Google Scholar
Dimitrov, George. 1935. “Revolutionary Literature and the Struggle Against Fascism.” International Literature 4: 5356.Google Scholar
Đurić, Dubravka. 2003. “Radical Poetic Practices: Concrete and Visual Poetry in the Avant-garde and Neo-avant-garde.” In Impossible Histories: Historical Avant-gardes, Neo-avant-gardes and Post-avant-gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918–1991, edited by Đurić, Dubravka and Šuvaković, Miško, 6495. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Grivec, Franc. 1909. Vzhodno cerkveno vprašanje. Maribor: Tiskarna sv. Cirila.Google Scholar
Grogin, Robert C. 1988. The Bergsonian Controversy in France, 1900–1914. Calgary: University of Calgary Press.Google Scholar
Gubser, Michael. 2014. The Far Reaches: Phenomenology, Ethics and Social Renewal in Central Europe. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Hladnik, Miran. 1991. “Regionalism in Slovene Rural Prose.” Slovene Studies 8 (2): 143153.Google Scholar
Hribar, Spomenka. 1990. Edvard Kocbek in križarsko gibanje. Maribor: Založba obzorja.Google Scholar
Inkret, Andrej. 2011. In stoletje bo zardelo: Kocbek, življenje in delo. Ljubljana: Modrijan.Google Scholar
Kalezić, Vasilije. 1975. Pokret socijalne literature: književna studija. Belgrade: Petar Kočić.Google Scholar
Kikić, Hasan. 1969. Pripovjetke, Provincija u pozadini, Bukve, Lole i hrsuzi. Zagreb: Zora.Google Scholar
Kocbek, Edvard. 1928a. “Biocentrična metafizika.” Križ 1 (1): 106108.Google Scholar
Kocbek, Edvard. 1928b. “Marksizem in krščanstvo.” Križ 1 (8–9): 148151.Google Scholar
Kocbek, Edvard. 1929. “Poznavanje vzhoda.” Križ 2 (9–10): 163167.Google Scholar
Kocbek, Edvard. 1967. Tovarišija: dnevniški zapiski od 17 maja 1942 do 1 maja 1943. Maribor: Obzorja.Google Scholar
Kocbek, Edvard. 1977. Zbrane pesmi. Ljubljana: Cankarjeva založba.Google Scholar
Kocbek, Edvard. 1990. Nothing is Lost: Selected Poems. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Kreft, Bratko. 1967. Celjske grofje, Velika puntarija, Krajnski komedijanti. Ljubljana: Mladinska knjiga.Google Scholar
Kristeva, Julia. 1982. Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Krleža, Miroslav. 1919. “Hrvatska književna laž.” Plamen 1: 3240.Google Scholar
Krleža, Miroslav. 1956. Davni dani: zapisi 1914–1921. Zagreb: Zora.Google Scholar
Krleža, Miroslav. 2003. “The Drava Valley motifs.” Journal of Croatian Studies 44: 157190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kusin, Vladimir. 1971. The Intellectual Origins of the Prague Spring: The Development of Reformist Ideas in Czechoslovakia, 1956–1967. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Lasić, Stanko. 1970. Sukob na književnoj ljevici, 1928–1952. Zagreb: Liber.Google Scholar
Lasić, Stanko. 1982. Krleža, kronologija života i rada. Zagreb: Grafički zavod hrvatske.Google Scholar
Lukacs, Georg. 1963. The Historical Novel. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
Lustig, Michael Mile. 1982. “Leon Trotsky and Milovan Đilas: Critics of Soviet and Yugoslav Bureaucracy.” PhD diss., Brown University.Google Scholar
Očak, Ivan. 1982. Krleža – Partija: Miroslav Krleža u radničkom i komunističkom pokretu, 1917–1941. Zagreb: Spektar.Google Scholar
Ort, Thomas. 2013. Art and Life in Modernist Prague: Karel Čapek and His Generation, 1911–1938. New York, NY: Palgrave MacMillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prunk, Janko. 1977. Pot krščanskih socialistov v osvobodilno fronto slovenskega naroda. Ljubljana: Cankarjeva založba.Google Scholar
Reinhartz, Dennis. 1981. Milovan Đilas, a Revolutionary as Writer. Boulder, CO: East European Monographs.Google Scholar
Satterwhite, James. 1992. Varieties of Marxist Humanism: Philosophical Revisionism in Postwar Eastern Europe. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press.Google Scholar
Sayer, Derek. 2013. Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century: A Surrealist History. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Sher, Gerson. 1977. Praxis: Marxist Criticism and Dissent in Socialist Yugoslavia. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Shore, Marci. 2006. Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation's Life and Death in Marxism, 1918–1968. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Stavrianos, L. S. 1944. Balkan Federation: A History of the Movement Toward Balkan Unity in Modern Times. Northampton, MA: Smith College.Google Scholar
Šicel, Miroslav. 1975. Hrvatska moderna: kritika i književna povijest. Zagreb: Zora.Google Scholar
Todorova, Maria. 2009. Imagining the Balkans. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Tucović, Dimitrije. 1945. Srbija i Arbanija: jednog prilog kritici zavojevačke politike srpske buržoazije. Beograd: Kultura.Google Scholar
Vodnik, France. 1935. “Obrazi novega rodu: III. Edvard Kocbek.” Dom in svet 48 (1–2): 6877.Google Scholar
Wachtel, Andrew. 1998. Making a Nation, Breaking a Nation: Literature and Cultural Politics in Yugoslavia. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Wierzbicki, Jan. 1980. Miroslav Krleža. Zagreb: Liber.Google Scholar
Zogović, Radovan. 1937. Tri članka o srpskom eposu. Belgrade: Naša stvarnost.Google Scholar
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Literature, revolution, and national aesthetics on the interwar Yugoslav left
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Literature, revolution, and national aesthetics on the interwar Yugoslav left
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Literature, revolution, and national aesthetics on the interwar Yugoslav left
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *