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Islam and Ethnic Conflict: Hypotheses and Post-Communist Illustrations*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2018

Shale Horowitz
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA. Email: shale@uwm.edu
Corresponding
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Extract

The end of the Cold War drew increasing attention to ongoing and new ethnic conflicts—particularly because many of the high-profile new conflicts broke out amid the ruins of communism. Since 11 September 2001 there has been even more discussion about whether and how Islam contributes to international and civilizational conflict. However, there has been little work attempting to understand whether Islam plays any distinctive role in ethnic conflicts. Much work on ethnic conflict assumes that Islam is just one possible component of ethnic and national identities, and that it has no distinctive influence. Others examine whether Islam always has a similar impact on ethnic conflict—typically based upon identifying states or minority groups as having majority Muslim populations.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Association for the Study of Nationalities 

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