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Molecular phylogeny of the Leptosphaeria maculans–L. biglobosa species complex

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 January 2004

Edouard MENDES-PEREIRA
Affiliation:
Unité Phytopathologie et Méthodologies de la Détection Versailles (PMDV), Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Route de Saint Cyr, F-78026 Versailles cedex, France. E-mail: rouxel@versailles.inra.fr
Marie-Hélène BALESDENT
Affiliation:
Unité Phytopathologie et Méthodologies de la Détection Versailles (PMDV), Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Route de Saint Cyr, F-78026 Versailles cedex, France. E-mail: rouxel@versailles.inra.fr
Hortense BRUN
Affiliation:
Unité Mixte de Recherche BiO3P, INRA, Domaine de la Motte, BP 35327, F-35653 Le Rheu Cedex, France.
Thierry ROUXEL
Affiliation:
Unité Phytopathologie et Méthodologies de la Détection Versailles (PMDV), Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Route de Saint Cyr, F-78026 Versailles cedex, France. E-mail: rouxel@versailles.inra.fr
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Abstract

Leptosphaeria maculans (anamorph Phoma lingam), the ascomycete causing stem canker of crucifers, is a species complex that can be separated into at least seven distinct subgroups using a combination of biochemical and molecular criteria. In the present study sequences of the entire ITS region, including the 5.8S rDNA, of 38 isolates representing the seven subgroups, along with specimens from culture collections, were analysed, compared to those of closely related Leptosphaeria species, and the phylogeny inferred using parsimony and distance analyses. A well-supported clade encompassed all isolates of the seven subgroups along with L. conferta, a known saprobe of dried crucifer stems. The L. maculans isolates were further separated into two well-supported clades corresponding to L. maculans s. str. and the recently named L. biglobosa. Parsimony and distance analyses further separated groups within both species, usually corresponding to specific host plants or geographic origin, e.g. L. maculans ‘brassicae’ from cultivated Brassica, L. maculans ‘lepidii’, from Lepidium sp., L. biglobosa ‘brassicae’, from various Brassica species, L. biglobosa ‘thlaspii’ from Thlaspi arvense, L. biglobosa ‘erysimii’ from Erysimum sp., and L. biglobosa ‘canadensis’ mostly found in central Canada. The oldest L. maculans specimens maintained in international collections clustered with either L. maculans ‘brassicae’, L. biglobosa ‘brassicae’, or a still different group closely related to L. biglobosa ‘thlaspii’. The evolutionary relationships between the seven infraspecific groups are discussed in terms of phytopathological relevance and species isolation linked with specific life cycle, geographic isolation or host specificity.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The British Mycological Society 2003

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