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Zinc oxide nanocluster formation by low energy ion implantation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

I. Muntele
Affiliation:
Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A&M University, NORMAL AL-35762, USA
P. Thevenard
Affiliation:
Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A&M University, NORMAL AL-35762, USA LPMCN, UMR CNRS 5586, Universite Claude Bernard LYON, 699622 VILLEURBANNE Cedex, FRANCE
C. Muntele
Affiliation:
Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A&M University, NORMAL AL-35762, USA
B. Chhay
Affiliation:
Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A&M University, NORMAL AL-35762, USA
D. Ila
Affiliation:
Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A&M University, NORMAL AL-35762, USA
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Abstract

Variable size nanocluster embedded in silicon substrate were obtained by low energy implantation methods. We used optical spectroscopy to measure the optical properties of the implanted samples. The implantation parameters like the ions energy, dose and sputtering rate were calculated with SRIM [13]. Most of the implanted Zn ions (83%) clustered and oxidized during the implantation process, with the remaining 17% being oxidized during annealing in air.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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