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Young’s Modulus of Cortical and P19 Derived Neurons Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 March 2012

Elise Spedden
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, 4 Colby St, Medford Ma 02155
James D. White
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University, 4 Colby St, Medford Ma 02155
David Kaplan
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University, 4 Colby St, Medford Ma 02155 Department of Chemical Engineering, Tufts University, 4 Colby St, Medford Ma 02155
Cristian Staii
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, 4 Colby St, Medford Ma 02155
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Abstract

In this paper we use the Atomic Force Microscope to measure the Young’s modulus for two types of neuronal cell bodies: cortical neurons obtained from rat embryos and neurons derived from P19 mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells. The neurons are plated on different substrates coated with two types of protein growth factors, poly-D-lysine and laminin. We report on the Young’s modulus of each type of neuron as well as the variation of modulus between cells plated on different protein substrates. We compare these results to various individual cell and bulk tissue measurements reported in literature. We additionally report on an observed change in the Young’s modulus of cortical neurons when subjected to a short-term reduction in ambient temperature.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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References

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Young’s Modulus of Cortical and P19 Derived Neurons Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy
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