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X-Ray Diffraction Study of Phase Formation and Growth in Nitrogen Implanted Iron: Temperature Effects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

R. J. Arnott
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Bldg 292, Watertown, MA, 02172
F. C. Burns
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Bldg 292, Watertown, MA, 02172
L. G. Carreiro
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Bldg 292, Watertown, MA, 02172
D. R. Chiphan
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Bldg 292, Watertown, MA, 02172
W. J. Croft
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Bldg 292, Watertown, MA, 02172
E. A. Johnson
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Bldg 292, Watertown, MA, 02172
J. V. Marzik
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Bldg 292, Watertown, MA, 02172
P. L. Sagalyn
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Bldg 292, Watertown, MA, 02172
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Abstract

We report preliminary results from an ongoing study of iron nitride grains formed in high purity iron under nitrogen ion bombardment. Under various implantation conditions, different iron nitride phases grow large enough to produce sharp x-ray diffraction lines. We have used these lines to examine the influence of target temperature during implantation. Between 200°C and 400°C increasing target temperature, which enhances dopant mobility, reduces the retained dose of nitrogen and restricts the formation of nitride phases. Over this temperature range, however, increasing vacancy mobility favors the growth of nitride grains and x-ray line breadth data suggests an optimum temperature for growth of Fe4N grains.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1987

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References

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X-Ray Diffraction Study of Phase Formation and Growth in Nitrogen Implanted Iron: Temperature Effects
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