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Versatile Hybrid Polymers as Matrices for Nanoparticle Preparation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Claudia Feldgitscher
Affiliation:
Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/165, Vienna, A1060, Austria
Sorin Ivanovici
Affiliation:
Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/165, Vienna, A1060, Austria
Guido Kickelbick
Affiliation:
Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/165, Vienna, A1060, Austria
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Abstract

Hybrid inorganic-organic polymers were prepared applying poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) crosslinked polysiloxanes as a matrix for the precipitation of metal or metal oxide nanoparticles. Polysiloxanes as flexible and hydrophobic polymer backbones were crosslinked with end-group functionalized PEO by using Pt-catalyzed hydrosilation reactions. Systematic variation of the chain length of the different components resulted in tunable matrices with adjustable hydrophilic regions. The chemical nature of the polysiloxane backbone and the thermal stability of the crosslinked polymer system facilitated nanoparticle preparation through different mechanisms.

The crosslinked hybrid polymers were infiltrated with solutions of lanthanide salts, cobalt carbonyl or HAuCl4 allowing the application of three different chemical methods (hydrolysis, thermal decomposition, reduction) for nanoparticle preparation. FT-IR, SEM and TEM analyses were used to characterize the insoluble hybrid systems.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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