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Vapor-Phase Synthesis and Surface Functionalization of ZnSe Nanoparticles in a Counterflow Jet Reactor

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Christos Sarigiannidis
Affiliation:
Departments of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo N.Y 14260, U.S.A.
Athos Petrou
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo N.Y 14260, U.S.A.
T. J. Mountziaris
Affiliation:
Departments of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo N.Y 14260, U.S.A. The National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Compound semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) exhibit unique size-dependent optoelectronic properties making them attractive for a variety of applications, including ultrasensitive biological detection, high-density information storage, solar energy conversion, and photocatalysis. There is presently a great need for developing scalable techniques that allow efficient synthesis, size control, and functionalization of quantum dots, without a loss of the desirable optical properties. We report experimental results on the properties and surface modification of ZnSe nanoparticles grown by a continuous vapor-phase technique utilizing an axisymmetric counterflow jet reactor. Luminescent ZnSe nanocrystals were obtained at room temperature by reacting vapors of dimethylzinc:triethylamine adduct with hydrogen selenide, diluted in a hydrogen carrier gas. The two reactants were supplied from opposite inlets of the counterflow jet configuration and initiated particle nucleation in a region near the stagnation point of the laminar flow field. Surface modification of nanoparticles by adsorption of 1-pentanethiol was used to control the rate of particle coalescence. The counterflow jet technique can be scaled up for commercial production and is compatible with other vapor-phase processing techniques used in the microelectronics industry.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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