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Ultrasonic Quantification Of Corroded Surfaces

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

W. M. Mullins
Affiliation:
Visiting Scientist, AFRL/MLLP-TMCI, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio
S. S. Shamachary
Affiliation:
Research Professor, University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, Ohio
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Abstract

The surface damage introduced by general corrosion attack of surfaces is considered deleterious to long term structural integrity. As a result, the quantification of this damage represents an interest in the NDE community. In this document, the chemical kinetics of general attack are used to model the morphology of the surface as a function of time of exposure. Timeof- flight ultrasonic data for corroded surfaces are presented which appear to agree with the model predictions. The experimental results are critically reviewed with respect to the practical limitations of the ultrasonic experiments. The effect of exposure on surface morphology and surface stress concentration are shown and related to the classic ultrasonic measurement techniques. The relationships are used to suggest potentially important ultrasonic measurement techniques and to underline the inherent limitations of many classical ultrasonic measurements.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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