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Trends of Nanoclusters' Growth by Physical Vapor Deposition Studied by Atomistic Simulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Abuhanif Bhuiyan
Affiliation:
abuhanif@ualberta.ca, University of Alberta, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Edmonton, Canada
Steven K. Dew
Affiliation:
steve.dew@ualberta.ca, University of Alberta, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Edmonton, Canada
Maria Stepanova
Affiliation:
Maria.Stepanova@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, National Institute for Nanotechnology, NRC, Edmonton, Canada
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Abstract

Efficient methodologies for synthesis of nanocrystals (NC) are a crucial component for creation of nanostructured electronic components. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) is one of the most flexible techniques to fabricate self-assembled arrangements of nanoclusters. Controllable fabrication of such assemblies can improve reliability of nanocapacitors, enhance performance of magnetic memories, and has many applications in opto-electronics devices, etc. However, size, shape and density of nanocrystals are highly sensitive to the process conditions such as duration of deposition, temperature, substrate material, etc. To efficiently synthesize nanocrystalline arrays by PVD, the process control factors should be understood in greater detail. In this work, we present a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model and report simulations that explicitly represent the PVD synthesis of nanocrystals on substrates. Here we study how varying the most important process parameters affects the morphologies of self-assembled metallic islands on substrates. We compare our results with experimentally observed surface morphologies generated by PVD and demonstrate that KMC models like this are an efficient tool for computer-aided design of PVD processes for synthesis of nanocrystals.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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