Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-xl4lj Total loading time: 0.174 Render date: 2021-06-13T03:53:37.191Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Tendency and Scale of Chemistry and Bonding Changes at SrTiO3 Grain Boundaries by Fe Segregation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Hui Gu
Affiliation:
Japan Science and Technology Corporation, “Ceramics Superplasticity” project, JFCC 2F, 2–4–1, Mutsuno, Atsuta, Nagoya 456, Japan, gu@ngo.jst-c.go.jp
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

Using a new EELS analysis method the local chemical and structural changes induced by Fe segregation to two types of grain boundaries in SrTiO3 were studied. At Σ5 boundary in bicrystals Fe segregation lowers O/Ti ratio but increases substantially Ti and O concentrations in boundary region. Sr-O bond has been severely changed by the segregation as revealed by ELNES. Grain boundaries in a polycrystalline sample were covered with titania-based amorphous films where Fe content is higher but Ti and O concentrations are both lower than the bulk levels, which are strikingly different from the bicrtysal. More dopants segregated to glass pockets at triple junctions. SiO2 was detected in one of the large pocket but not at the grain boundary films within the detection limit. These observations suggest the equilibrium defect chemistry and the related space charge theory may not be the only explanation for the grain boundary segregation in SrTiO3 Local structure modification at gram boundaries can trigger dramatical change of the chemistry to a degree higher than the segregation level. The existence of titania-based amorphous films at general grain boundaries makes it better to understand Fe segregation from the two phase (SrTiO3-TiO2) equilibrium.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Chiang, Y. -M. and Takagi, T., J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 73 (11), p. 3278–91 (1990);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Desu, S. B. and Payne, D. A., J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 73 (11), p. 33913421 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Gu, H., Ceh, M., Stemmer, S., Müllejans, H., Rühle, M., Ultramicroscopy 59, p. 215–27 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Gu, H., Cannon, R. M. and Rühle, M., J. Mater. Res., in press.Google Scholar
4. Gu, H., MRS symposium Proc. Vol. 453, in press.Google Scholar
5. Denk, I., Münch, W. and Maier, J., J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 78 (12), p. 3265–72 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Pan, X. -Q., Gu, H., Stemmer, S. and Rühle, M., Mater. Sci. Forum 207–209, p. 421–24 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Colliex, C., Tencé, M., Lefevre, E., Mory, C., Gu, H., Bouchet, D. and Jeanguillaume, C., Microchim. Acta 114/115, p. 7187 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Tanaka, I., Nakajima, T., Kawai, J., Adachi, H., Gu, H. and Rühle, M., Phil. Mag. Lett., in press.Google Scholar
9. Brydson, R., Garvie, L. A. J., Craven, A. J., Sauer, H. Hofer, F. and Cressey, G., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 5, p. 9379–92 (1993).Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Tendency and Scale of Chemistry and Bonding Changes at SrTiO3 Grain Boundaries by Fe Segregation
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Tendency and Scale of Chemistry and Bonding Changes at SrTiO3 Grain Boundaries by Fe Segregation
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Tendency and Scale of Chemistry and Bonding Changes at SrTiO3 Grain Boundaries by Fe Segregation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *