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Tem Studies of Polysilicon Emitter Bipolar Materials & Devices: Increased Interfacial Oxide Break-Up and Polysilicon Regrowth and Decreased Emitter Resistance by Fluorine Implantation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

C. D. Marsh
Affiliation:
Dept of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OXI 3PH, UK.
N. E. Moiseiwitsch
Affiliation:
Dept of Electronics & Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
J. Schiz
Affiliation:
Dept of Electronics & Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
G. R. Booker
Affiliation:
Dept of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OXI 3PH, UK.
P. Ashburn
Affiliation:
Dept of Electronics & Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
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Abstract

The role of fluorine (F) in the break-up of the native oxide and the regrowth of As doped poly-Si layers on unpatterned Si wafers and on patterned regions of Si device wafers at temperatures of 900°C to 1000°C are investigated by TEM and by the fabrication of npn poly-Si emitter bipolar devices. Results for unpatterned wafers with F show i) a 950°C dopant drive-in anneal causes oxide break-up and regrowth after a time suitable for the fabrication of devices, ii) a pre-anneal, before the As implant, further enhances the break-up and regrowth and iii) there is an optimum F dose of 5×1015/cm2. Based on these results poly-Si emitter bipolar devices were fabricated using F=5×1015/cm2, a pre-anneal and a 900°C As drive-in anneal. The results establish quantitatively the relationship between the interface structures and the specific emitter resistance, i.e. with no F there is no break-up or regrowth and the emitter resistance is high (114Ωμm2) while with F there is break-up and regrowth and the emitter resistance is low (17Ωμm2).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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References

1. Williams, J. D. and Ashburn, P., J. Appl. Phys. 72, 3169 (1992).10.1063/1.351480CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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3. Marsh, C. D., Moiseiwitsch, N. E, Booker, G. R. and Ashburn, P., Inst. Phys. Conf. Ser. 146, 457 (1995).Google Scholar
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6. Schiz, J., Moiseiwitsch, N. E., Marsh, C. D., Ashburn, P. and Booker, G. R., Proc. ESSDERC 26, 461 (1996).Google Scholar

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Tem Studies of Polysilicon Emitter Bipolar Materials & Devices: Increased Interfacial Oxide Break-Up and Polysilicon Regrowth and Decreased Emitter Resistance by Fluorine Implantation
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Tem Studies of Polysilicon Emitter Bipolar Materials & Devices: Increased Interfacial Oxide Break-Up and Polysilicon Regrowth and Decreased Emitter Resistance by Fluorine Implantation
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