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Synthesis of Iron Pyrite Film through Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 August 2012

Siva P Adusumilli
Affiliation:
Center for Autonomous Solar Power (CASP), State University of New York at Binghamton, Vestal, NY 13850, U.S.A. Dept. of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Vestal, NY 13850, U.S.A.
Tara P Dhakal
Affiliation:
Center for Autonomous Solar Power (CASP), State University of New York at Binghamton, Vestal, NY 13850, U.S.A.
Charles R Westgate
Affiliation:
Center for Autonomous Solar Power (CASP), State University of New York at Binghamton, Vestal, NY 13850, U.S.A. Dept. of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Vestal, NY 13850, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Pyrite phase of FeS2 has attracted substantial attention in the field of thin film solar technology because of its high optical absorption coefficient (~5 x 105 cm-1 at hν > 1.3eV) and the band gap of 0.95 eV. In this research, we have grown highly pure iron pyrite films using a low temperature atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique. The synthesis temperature is in the range of 375-400°C and Di-tert-butyl disulfide (TBDS) is used as the sulfur precursor. TBDS is a safe and low cost sulfur source unlike H2S, which is highly toxic and requires extreme care in handling. The films obtained were uniform and free from common impurity phases such as troilite and marcasite. The FeS2 films grown earlier with CVD synthesis and sulfurized using H2S had pinholes and contained secondary phases like marcasite and troilite. The FeS2 pyrite phase was confirmed using various characterization techniques that included SEM, EDS, XRD and XPS.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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References

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