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Synthesis and Raman Spectra of Cupric Oxide Quantum Dots

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

J.F. Xu
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119260, Republic of Singapore
W. Ji
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119260, Republic of Singapore
Z.X. Shen
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119260, Republic of Singapore
S.H. Tang
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119260, Republic of Singapore
X.R. Ye
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, P. R. China
D.Z. Jia
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, P. R. China
X.Q. Yin
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, P. R. China
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Abstract

We have synthesised CuO quantum dots by using a method of one-step solid state reaction under ambient conditions, and investigated them by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman scattering technique. The XRD shows that the sample is composed of single phase CuO with a monoclinic structure. The particle size estimated from the x-ray diffraction peaks is about 12 nm, consistent with the TEM result. The Raman spectra show that there are three Raman peaks at 282, 332 and 618 cm−1, which are much broader and shifted several cm−l to lower frequencies in comparison with those of bulk CuO crystal. The temperature dependence of the Raman spectra in the range 77–873 K is also presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

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References

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