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Structural and functional characterization of W-Si-N sputtered thin films for copper metallizations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

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Abstract

Ternary W-Si-N thin films have been reactively sputter-deposited from a W5Si3 target at different nitrogen partial pressures. The composition has been determined by 2.2 MeV4He+ beam, the structure by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, the chemical bonds by Fourier transform - infrared spectroscopy and the surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy. Electrical resistivity was measured by four point probe technique on the as grown films. The film as-deposited is amorphous with the Si/W ratio increasing from about 0.1 up to 0.55 with the nitrogen content going from 0 to 60 at%. The heat treatments up to 980 °C induce a loss of nitrogen in the nitrogen rich samples. Segregation of metallic tungsten occurs in the sample with low nitrogen content (W58Si21N21). Samples with high nitrogen content preserve the amorphous structure, despite of the precipitation of a more ordered phase inferred by FT-IR absorbance spectrum of the layer treated at highest temperature. The surface morphology depends upon the nitrogen content; the loss of nitrogen induces the formation of blistering and in the most nitrogen rich sample the formation of holes. Electrical resistivity preliminary results on the as grown layers range between 500 and 4750 μωcm passing from the lowest to the highest N concentration.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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