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Silicon Light Emissions from Boron Implant-Induced Extended Defects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

G. Z. Pan
Affiliation:
Microfabrication Laboratory, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095
R. P. Ostroumov
Affiliation:
Device Research Laboratory, and MARCO Focus Center on Functional Engineered Nano Architectonics-FENA, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095
L. P. Ren
Affiliation:
Nanoelectronics and Nanophotonics Laboratory, Global Nanosystems, Inc., Los Angeles, CA 90025
Y. G. Lian
Affiliation:
Microfabrication Laboratory, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095
K. L. Wang
Affiliation:
Device Research Laboratory, and MARCO Focus Center on Functional Engineered Nano Architectonics-FENA, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095
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Abstract

We studied the electroluminescence (EL) of boron-implanted p-n junction Si LEDs in correlation with the implant-induced extended defects of different types. By varying the post implant annealing conditions to tune the extended defects and by using plan-view transmission electron microscopy to identify them, we found that {113} defects along Si<110> are the ones that result in strong silicon light emission of the p-n junction Si LEDs other than {111} perfect prismatic and {111} faulted Frank dislocation loops. The EL peak intensity at about 1.1 eV of {113} defect-engineered Si LEDs is about twenty-five times higher than that of dislocation defect-engineered Si LEDs. The EL measured at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K indicated that the emissions related to the extended defects are from silicon band edge radiative recombination.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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