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Silicon carbide nanowires grown on 4H-SiC substrates by chemical vapor deposition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Siva Kotamraju
Affiliation:
sk329@msstate.edu, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi, United States
Bharat Krishnan
Affiliation:
bk42@ECE.MsState.EDU, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi, United States
Yaroslav Koshka
Affiliation:
ykoshka@ece.msstate.edu, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi, United States
Siddarth Sundaresan
Affiliation:
sid@genesicsemi.com, GeneSiC Semiconductor Inc, Dulles, Virginia, United States
Hany Issa
Affiliation:
hany.issa@genesicsemi.com, GeneSiC Semiconductor Inc, Dulles, Virginia, United States
Ranbir Singh
Affiliation:
ranbir.singh@genesicsemi.com, GeneSiC Semiconductor Inc, Dulles, Virginia, United States
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Abstract

In this work, SiC nanowires (NWs) were grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on commercial 4H-SiC substrates. The growth was conducted in an inductively heated hot wall CVD reactor traditionally used for homoepitaxy of 4H-SiC, operating at 150 Torr with H2 as the carrier gas. The growth experiments utilized the precursor chemistry that previously enabled the so-called low-temperature homoepitaxial growth of SiC – SiCl4 as the silicon precursor and CH3Cl as the carbon precursor. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mode was employed. Two metal catalysts Au and Ni were used for NW growth in a wide range of growth temperatures from below 10500C to above 13000C. It was established that high precursor flow rates favor the regular epitaxial growth (though disturbed by the presence of the islands of the metal catalyst) at temperatures above 12000C. Reduction of the precursor flow rates and the growth temperature caused formation of micro-needles and eventually NWs. NW diameters in the range from below 10 to 100 nm were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Only SiC phase with no presence of Si, even for the growth temperatures down to 10500C, was confirmed by X-ray diffraction.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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Silicon carbide nanowires grown on 4H-SiC substrates by chemical vapor deposition
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