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Self-aligned growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes using optical near-field effects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Y.S. Zhou
Affiliation:
yzhou5@unl.edu, Univ of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States
W. Xiong
Affiliation:
wei.liu.xiong@gmail.com, Univ of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States
M. Mahjouri-Samani
Affiliation:
masoud.mahjouri-samani@huskers.unl.edu, Univ of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States
W.Q. Yang
Affiliation:
avemaxlibra@gmail.com, Univ of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States
K.J. Yi
Affiliation:
kjyi1@bigred.unl.edu, Univ of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States
X.N. He
Affiliation:
hexiangnan@gmail.com, Univ of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States
Yong Feng Lu
Affiliation:
ylu2@unl.edu, Univ of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States
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Abstract

By applying optical near-field effects in a laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) process, self-aligned growth of ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was realized in a well controlled manner at a relatively low substrate temperature due to the nanoscale heating enhancement induced by the optical near-field effects. Bridge structures containing single suspending SWNT channels were successfully fabricated. Ultra-sharp tip-shaped metallic electrodes were used as optical antennas in localizing and enhancing the optical fields. Numerical simulations using High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) reveal significant enhancement of electrical fields at the metallic electrode tips under laser irradiation, which induces localized heating at the tips. Numerical simulations were carried out to optimize SWNT growth conditions, such as electrode tip sharpness and film thickness, for maximal enhancement of electrical near field and localized heating.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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