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Seismic Velocity Structure of the EDZ Around Drifts at the Kamaishi and Tono Mines in Japan

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

T. Sato
Affiliation:
Tono Geoscience Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation
H. Matsui
Affiliation:
Tono Geoscience Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation
T. Kikuchi
Affiliation:
Tono Geoscience Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation
K. Sugihara
Affiliation:
Tono Geoscience Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation
S. Okubo
Affiliation:
Geo-System Engineering, The University of Tokyo
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Abstract

The excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) is defined as the rock zone where rock properties and conditions have been changed due to the processes induced by excavation, such as excavation damage, stress redistribution and desaturation. In-situ excavation disturbance experiment has been performed to determine the rock properties and width of the EDZ at the Kamaishi and Tono mines in Japan. Rock mass fails when blasting vibration velocity exceeds limit velocity so that we can estimate excavation damaged zone from vibration measurement. The width of the zone where blasting vibration velocity exceeded the limit velocity is roughly consistent with the width of low seismic velocity layer detected from the seismic refraction survey at both mines.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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References

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