Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-5zgkz Total loading time: 0.241 Render date: 2021-09-20T03:29:00.229Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

A Review of Silicon-On-Insulator Formation by Oxygen Ion Implantation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

Russell F. Pinizzotto*
Affiliation:
Materials Science Laboratory, Texas Instruments Incorporated, P.O.Box 225936, M.S.147, Dallas, Texas, 75265, USA
Get access

Abstract

Silicon-on-Insulator structures will be an important technological advance used in future VLSI, VHSIC and threedimensional integrated circuits. The most mature SOI technology other than silicon-on-sapphire is SIMOX, or Separation by Implanted Oxygen. High energy oxygen ions are implanted into single crystal silicon until a stoichiometric buried silicon dioxide layer is formed. After implantation, the material is annealed at high temperature to remove implantation induced defects. The structure is completed by the growth of a thin epitaxial silicon layer. Devices and complex circuits have been successfully fabricated by several research groups. This paper reviews the development of this buried oxide SOI technology from 1973 to 1983. The five major sections discuss the advantages of SOI, the basics of buried oxide formation, the literature published between 1973 and 1983, key issues that must be solved before large scale implementation takes place and, finally, predictions of future developments.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1984

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Dexter, R.J., Watelski, S.B. and Picraux, S.T., Appl. Phys. Lett., 23, 455 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Nakashima, S., Akiya, M. and Kato, K., Elec. Lett., 19, 568 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Gibbons, J.F., Johnson, W.F. and Mylroie, S.W., Projected Range Statistics, Dowden, Hutchinson and Ross, Stroudsburg, PA, 1975.Google Scholar
4. Badawi, M.H. and Anand, K.V., J. Phys. D, 10, 1931 (1977).Google Scholar
5. Izumi, K., Doken, M. and Ariyoshi, H., Elec. Lett., 14, 593 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Lindhard, J., Scharff, M. and Schiott, H.E., Matt. Fys. Medd. Dan. Vid. Selsk., 33, 1 (1963).Google Scholar
7. Das, K., Butcher, J.B. and Anand, K.V. in Chemical Vapor Deposition 1981, edited by Blocher, J.M. Jr., Vuillard, G.E. and Wahl, G., The Electrochem. Soc., Pennington, NJ, 81–7, 427 (1981).Google Scholar
8. Lam, H.W., Pinizzotto, R.F., Yuan, H.T. and Bellavance, D.W., Elec. Lett., 17, 356 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Hayashi, T., Okamoto, H. and Homma, Y., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 19, 1005 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Hayashi, T., Maeyama, S. and Yoshi, S., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 19, 1111 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Pinizzotto, R.F., Vaandrager, B.L. and Lam, H.W., Proc. Mater. Res. Soc., 7, 401 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Ohwada, K., Omura, Y. and Sano, E., 1980 International Electron Devices Meeting Technical Digest, IEEE, New York, 1980, pg.756.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Hayashi, T., Okamoto, H. and Homma, Y., Inst. Phys. Conf. Ser., 59, 533 (1981).Google Scholar
14. Kilner, J.A., Littlewood, S., Hemment, P.L.F., Maydell-Ondrusz, E. and Stephens, K.G., presented at the Sixth International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis May 1983 paper Th 7. To be published in Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res., (1984).Google Scholar
15. Irita, Y., Kunii, Y., Takahashi, M. and Kajiyama, K., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 20, L909 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Das, K., Butcher, J.B., Wilson, M.C., Booker, G.R., Wellby, D.W., Hemment, P.L.F. and Anand, K.V., Inst. Phys. Conf. Ser., 60, 307 (1981).Google Scholar
17. Kazmerski, L.L., Dick, J.R. and Matson, R.J., American Vacuum Society Thirtieth National Symposium, Paper ESThA01, Boston, MA, November 1983.Google Scholar
18. Maeyama, S. and Kajiyama, K., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 21, 744 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Izumi, K., Omura, Y., Ishikawa, M. and Sano, E., in Digest of Technical Papers, 1982 Symposium on VLSI Technology, Kanagawa, Japan.Google Scholar
19a. Also see Izumi, K., Omura, Y. and Sakai, T., J. Elec. Mat., 12, 845 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20. Malhi, S.D.S., Lam, H.W., Pinizzotto, R.F., Hamdi, A.H. and McDaniel, F.D., 1982 International Electron Devices Meeting Technical Digest, IEEE, New York, 1982, pg. 107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21. Hamdi, A.H., McDaniel, F.D.,. Pinizzotto, R.F., Matteson, S., Lam, H.W. and Malhi, S.D.S., Appl. Phys. Lett., 41, 1143 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22. Hamdi, A.H., McDaniel, F.D., Pinizzotto, R.F., Matteson, S., Lam, H.W. and Malhi, S.D.S., IEEE Trans. on Nucl. Sci., NS–l30, 1722 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23. Kim, M.J., Brown, D.M. and Garfinkel, M., J. Appl. Phys., 54, 1991 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24. Nicolet, M.A., Lien, C.D., Pinizzotto, R.F. and Matteson, S., unpublished results.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A Review of Silicon-On-Insulator Formation by Oxygen Ion Implantation
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

A Review of Silicon-On-Insulator Formation by Oxygen Ion Implantation
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

A Review of Silicon-On-Insulator Formation by Oxygen Ion Implantation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *