Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-cgcw8 Total loading time: 0.254 Render date: 2021-09-21T10:52:11.963Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Reaction Chamber and Cathode Configurations in Arc Production of Fullerenes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

E. Pasqualini
Affiliation:
Dpto. Materiales. CAC. Comision Nacional de Energía Atómica. Av. Libertador 8250, (1429) Buenos Aires, Argentina
C. Podesta
Affiliation:
Faculatad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales., UNBA
A. GarcÍa
Affiliation:
Faculatad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales., UNBA
A. Rafael
Affiliation:
Faculatad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales., UNBA
S. Dengra
Affiliation:
Faculatad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales., UNBA
M. Paulozzi
Affiliation:
Faculatad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales., UNBA
Get access

Abstract

The reaction chamber in the arc production of fullerenes was redesigned with a nozzle surrounding the decomposition zone to allow for clean collection of soot in a filtering cartridge. Quantitative analysis in the region of 300–430 nm in UV-visible spectra permits determination of the abundance of C60 and C70 in the soot. Calibrated curves of absorptivity for both pure fullerenes were employed. In equivalent conditions of current and pressure, electrographites of different origins have different decomposition rates and yields. A mechanism to interpret the cathodic deposit formation is proposed. Decomposition inside a closed cathodic cylinder yields 100% deposit.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Kräitschmer, W., Lamb, L., Fostiropoulos, K., Huffman, D.. Nature 347, 354 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. The Fullerenes, eds. Kroto, H., Fisher, J. and Cox, D. (Pergamon Press, 1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Lamb, L., Huffman, D.. J. Phys. Chem. Solids, 54, N°12, 1635 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Willard, H., Merrit, L. Jr., Dean, J., Selle, F. Jr., Instrumental Methods of Analysis, 7th ed., Ch. 7 (Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1988).Google Scholar
5. Wright, J.. Molecular Crystals (Cambridge University Press, 1987).Google Scholar
6. Sivaraman, N., Dhamodaran, R., Kaliappan, I., Srinivasan, T., Rao, P.V., Mathews, C.. J. Org. Chem. 57, 6077 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Ruoff, R., Tse, D., Malhotra, R., Lorents, D.. J. Phys. Chem. 97, 3379 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Welding Handbook, 7th ed. 1, 52 (American Welding Society, 1981).Google Scholar
9. Carslaw, H. and Jaeger, J.. 2nd ed. Ch. 4.5, 140 (Oxford at the Clarendon Press, 1959).Google Scholar
10. Nuclear Graphite, ed. Nightingale, R. (Academic Press, 1962).Google Scholar
11. Seraphin, S., Zhou, D. and Jiao, J.. Carbon 31, N°7, 1209 (1993).Google Scholar
12. Seraphin, S., Zhou, D., Jiao, J., Withers, J. and Loutfy, R.. Carbon 31, N°5, 685 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Ebbesen, T., Hiura, H., Fujita, J., Ochiai, Y., Matsui, S., Tanigaki, K.. Chem. Phys. Lett. 209, 83 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Zhou, O., Fleming, R., Murphy, D., Chen, C., Haddon, R., Ramirez, A., Glarum, S.. Science, 263, 1744, 25 March 1994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Hoyaux, M.. Arc Physics (Springer-Verlag, New York Inc., 1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Reaction Chamber and Cathode Configurations in Arc Production of Fullerenes
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Reaction Chamber and Cathode Configurations in Arc Production of Fullerenes
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Reaction Chamber and Cathode Configurations in Arc Production of Fullerenes
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *