Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-f4n6r Total loading time: 0.179 Render date: 2021-05-13T04:17:50.095Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Preparation Of Polyimide-Silica Hybrid Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Masa-aki Kakimoto
Affiliation:
Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro Tokyo 152, Japan
Atsushi Morikawa
Affiliation:
Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro Tokyo 152, Japan
Yoshitake Iyoku
Affiliation:
Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro Tokyo 152, Japan
Yoshio Imai
Affiliation:
Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro Tokyo 152, Japan
Get access

Abstract

Polyimide-silica hybrid films were successfully prepared by the sol-gel reaction starting from a mixture of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), a solution ofpolyamic acid in N, N-dimethylacetamide and water of pH 7 and pH 3. The hybrid films were obtained by the hydrolysis-polycondensation of TEOS in the polyamic acid solution, followed by heating at 270°C. Fairly flexible films were obtained for silica contents up to 70 wt%. The films containing less than 8 wt% of silica were yellow and transparent, whereas the films with higher silica contents were yellow and opaque. The density of the silica in the hybrid films was estimated to be 1.65 and 1.69 g/cm3 (pH 7 and pH 3). The29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum indicated that the silica in the films consisted of non-hydroxy, monohydroxy, and dihydroxy siloxane structures. Silica particles with submicron diameter were observed in the hybrid films containing less than 8 wt% silica, whereas larger particle size around 5 μ m in the case of higher silica content. The decomposition temperature of the hybrid films increased with increasing silica content. The glass transition temperature of the hybrid films showed the minimum at 8 wt% of silica content. Tensile properties, such as elongation at break, tensile strength, and tensile modulus also exhibited the same tendency. The linear thermal expansion coefficient of the silica in the hybrid films was estimated to be 1.3 × 10−5 and 0.3 × 10−5 (pH 7 and pH 3), which suggested that the silica had a porous structure.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1991

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Hench, L. L., West, J. K., Chem. Rev., 90,33 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Wilkes, G. L., Huang, H-H, Glaser, R. H., in Silicon-Raed Polymer Science A Cnmprehen asive Resnurce, edited by Zeigler, J. M., Fearon, F. W. G., Advances in Chemistry Se ries, 224, (American Chemical Society, 1990), p. 207.Google Scholar
3. Ravaine, D., Seminel, A., Charbouillot, Y., Vincens, M., J. Non-Cryst. Solids, E 2, 210 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Huang, H-H., Wilkes, G. L., Polym. Bull., 18 455 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Glaser, R.H., Wilkes, G. L., Polym. Bull., 19,51 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Huang, H-H., Wilkes, G. L., Carlson, J. C., Polymer, 30,2001 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Fujita, M., Honda, K., Polym. Commun., 30, 200 (1989).Google Scholar
8. Nakanishi, K.,Soga, N., J. Non-Cryst. Solids,,108 157 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Mauritz, K. A., Warren, R. M., Macromolecules, 22, 1730 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Stefanithis, I. D., Mauritz, K. A., Macromolecules,, 23 2397 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Noell, J. L. W., Wilkes, G. L., Mohanty, D. K., MacGrath, J. E., J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 40, 1177 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Huang, H-H., Oriler, B., Wilkes, L., Polym. Bull.,.14, 557 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Huang, H-H., Orier, B., Wilkes, G. L., Macromolecules, 20, 1322 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Ning, Y. -P., Tang, M. -Y., Jiang, C. -Y., Mark, J. E., Roth, W. C., J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 29,3209 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Mark, J. E., Jiang, C. -Y., Tang, M. -Y., Macromolecules, 17,2613 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Jiang, C. -Y., Mark, J. E., Makromol. Chem., 85, 2609 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Ning, Y. -P., Mark, J. E., J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 30, 3519 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Mark, J.E., Ning, Y. -P., Jiang, C. -Y., Tang, M. -Y., Roth, W. C., Polymer, 26, 2069 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Sur, G. S., Mark, J. E., Makromol. Chem., 182,2861 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20. Chujo, Y., Ihara, E., Ihara, H., Saegusa, T., Macromolecules, 22,2040 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21. Chujo, Y., Ihara, E., Kure, S., Suzuki, K., Saegusa, T., Polymer Preprints, 31 (1), 59 (1990).Google Scholar
22. Smog, C. E., in Maeromolecular Synthesis: Coil Vol 1, edited by Moore, J. A., (John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1977), p. 295.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Preparation Of Polyimide-Silica Hybrid Films
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Preparation Of Polyimide-Silica Hybrid Films
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Preparation Of Polyimide-Silica Hybrid Films
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *