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Pore Structure of Low Porosity DSP Cement Pastes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Sara A. Touse
Affiliation:
Center for Cement Composite Materials, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801
Thomas A. Bier
Affiliation:
Center for Cement Composite Materials, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801
Cheryl A. Knepfler
Affiliation:
Center for Cement Composite Materials, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801
J. Francis Young
Affiliation:
Center for Cement Composite Materials, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801
Richard L. Berger
Affiliation:
Center for Cement Composite Materials, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801
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Abstract

The pore structure of low porosity cement pastes containing varying quantities of silica fume has been examined using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and nitrogen adsorption (NA) measurements. The water:solid ratio for all DSP pastes studied was 0.18. It was observed that, as for conventional pastes, removal of water by solvent replacement with methanol minimizes changes to the pore structure. Vacuum or oven drying severely reduces specific surface area and obscures important trends.

It was found that capillary porosity in excess of 10 nm (100 Å) is essentially absent and that the pore volume measured can be considered an intrinsic part of the binding phase. The influence of silica fume and curing times on pore structure has been measured and the implications of the data will be discussed. Comparisons will be made with conventional cement pastes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1989

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References

[1] Bache, H.H., in The Second International Conference on Superlasticizers in Concrete, (Ontario, Canada, 1981), pp. 535.Google Scholar
[2] Wise, S. et al. , in Very High Strength Cement-Based Materials, edited by Young, F.J., (Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 42, Pittsburgh, PA 1984) pp. 253263.Google Scholar
[3] Roy, D.M., Science, 235, pp.651658, (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[4] Hjorth, L., Nordic Concrete Research Publ. 1, 118 (Nordic Concr. Fed., Oslo, 1982).Google Scholar
[5] Feldmann, R.F., in The Use of Fly Ash. Silica Fume. Slag. and Other Mineral By-products in Concrete, (ACI SP 79–22, Montebello, Canada, 1983).Google Scholar
[6] Diamond, S., Cement and Concrete Research, 1, 531545 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[7] Bier, Th. A., Kropp, J., and Hilsdorf, H.K., presented at the III. Workshop über die Charakterisierung von feinteiligen und porösen Festkörpern, Bad Soden, FRG, 1986 (unpublished).Google Scholar

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