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Plasma Enhanced Mocvd of BaTiO3 Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

Peter S. Kirlin
Affiliation:
Advanced Technology Materials, 7 Commerce Dr., Danbury, CT. 06810
Salora Krupanidhi
Affiliation:
224 Materials Research Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802
Steven Nutt
Affiliation:
Division of Engineering, Box D, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912
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Abstract

Bulk BaTiO3 has a large linear electro-optic coefficient and a very high dielectric constant. We report results obtained for two different MOCVD processes designed to deposit BaTiO3 films with properties suitable for nonlinear electro-optic or high charge storage applications. Epitaxial BaTiO3 films have been grown on NdGaO3 [100] substrates using a high temperature thermal process; the substrate temperature was 1000°C and the total pressure was 4 torr. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) measurements indicate highly textured, single phase films on the NdGaO3 substrate which are predominantly [100] oriented. Fine grained polycrystalline films have been grown on Pt at 600°C by plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PEMOCVD). Specular IR reflectance was used to determine the concentration of BaCO3 in the film, which was significantly reduced by the plasma. The polycrystalline films had dielectric constants as large as 300 and resistivities exceeding 5 x 108 Ω-cm at room temperature.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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References

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