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Photoresponse Studies of The Polarization Dependence of the CdGeAs2 Band Edge

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

G. J. Brown
Affiliation:
Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/MLPO, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7707
M. C. Ohmer
Affiliation:
Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/MLPO, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7707
P. G. Schunemann
Affiliation:
Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Co., Nashua, NH 03061-2035
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Abstract

Mid-infrared photoresponse studies were performed on an oriented p-type cadmium germanium arsenide uniaxial crystal. The effects of optical polarization alignment, parallel and perpendicular to the c-axis of the crystal, were studied, as well as the effects of the transport electric-field direction. The measured optical band edge was 0.578 eV at 10 K for all polarization and bias configurations. This band gap energy is in good agreement with absorption and photoluminescence results for this sample. However, the photoresponse spectrum measured with unpolarized light at 10 K showed a much lower onset at 0.50 eV. This difference in the low temperature activation energy of the photoresponse is attributed to deep native defect levels near the band edge. These deep levels at times obscure the true band edge and can cause under estimates of the band gap energy. These results can explain the wide disparity in the reported CdGeAs2 band gap in the literature. In addition, the intensity of the photoresponse was found to be only slightly dependent on the optical polarization direction, but strongly dependent on the bias electric-field direction. The largest photoreponse was observed when the optical polarization was parallel to the c-axis and the bias electric field was perpendicular to the c-axis. The bias electric-field direction also had a significant effect upon the temperature dependence of the peak photoresponse intensity. The temperature dependence of the CdGeAs2 energy band gap was determined by empirical fitting.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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References

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