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Parallel FDTD Simulations on Optical and Acoustic Metamaterials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Kenji Tsuruta
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530, Japan
Shinji Nagai
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530, Japan
Ryosuke Umeda
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530, Japan
Tomoyuki Kurose
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530, Japan
Noriaki Maetani
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530, Japan
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Abstract

We perform large-scale finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations with the aid of efficient parallel-computing algorithms for designing optical and acoustic metamaterials, where either electromagnetic or elastic constants in the materials are artificially modulated via nano/micro-structuring.

For optical metamaterials, effects of nanostructure on dielectric properties are taken into account by introducing the Drude-Lorentz model and a hybrid quantum-mechanical/classical FDTD method for optical dispersion of simple metal particles. Using these computational methods, we assess the materials dependence of light-confinement efficiency in the recently proposed novel structure that combines dielectrics and metamaterials periodically.

In the acoustic case, we perform the parallel FDTD simulations of elastic-wave propagations in 2D phononic crystals. The negative refraction of acoustic wave is shown to occur via a negative effective mass appeared in their phonon band-structures. We demonstrate that the focal intensity by the lens effect and its energy-transfer efficiency can be optimized by adapting the filling fraction of the crystal.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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References

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