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Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance of Arsenic Antisites in GaAs MBE Layers Grown at Low Temperatures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

F. C. Rong
Affiliation:
Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703
L. Fotiadis
Affiliation:
Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703
H.-J. Sun
Affiliation:
Sherman Fairchild Laboratory, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015
G. D. Watkins
Affiliation:
Sherman Fairchild Laboratory, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015
M. A. Taysing-Lara
Affiliation:
Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703
J. Flemish
Affiliation:
Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703
W. H. Chang
Affiliation:
Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703
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Abstract

Observation of Arsenic antisites (AsGa) in GaAs layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at low substrate temperatures (∼ 200°C) is reported, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), magnetic circular dichroism in absorption (MCDA), and MCDA tagged by optically detected magnetic resonance (MCDA-ODMR). This experiment confirms that there is a MCD absorption band directly associated with AsGa in the GaAs layers. The AsGa concentration in the GaAs layers is found to decrease by about one order of magnitude after annealing at 600°C for two minutes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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Footnotes

a)

Current address: GEO-Centers, Inc., c/o U.S. Army Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703; work performed at U.S. Army Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey.

References

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