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Observation of Vacancy-Oxygen Complexes in Silicon Implanted with Substoichiometric Doses of Oxygen Ions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

A. I. Belogorokhov
Affiliation:
Centre for Analysis of Substances, 9, Elektrodnaya St., 111524 Moscow, Russia Institute of Rare Metals, 156–517, Leninsky Prospekt, 117571 Moscow, Russia
L. A. Charnyi
Affiliation:
Centre for Analysis of Substances, 9, Elektrodnaya St., 111524 Moscow, Russia Moscow Steel and Alloys Institute, 4, Leninsky Prospekt, 117936 Moscow, Russia
A. B. Danilin
Affiliation:
Centre for Analysis of Substances, 9, Elektrodnaya St., 111524 Moscow, Russia
A. W. Nemirovski
Affiliation:
Centre for Analysis of Substances, 9, Elektrodnaya St., 111524 Moscow, Russia Moscow Steel and Alloys Institute, 4, Leninsky Prospekt, 117936 Moscow, Russia
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Abstract

Cz-grown p-Si(111) specimens were implanted with O+ ions at an energy of 150 keV and doses of 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 (·1017) cm−2. The implantation temperatures used were 350 and 650 °C. After the implantation, some of the specimens were annealed at 1000 °C for 1 h in a nitrogen atmosphere. IR data indicated the presence of vacancy-oxygen complexes both before and after annealing, irrespective of implantation temperature. Double-crystal X-ray rocking curves also showed that vacancy-type defects are present.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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Observation of Vacancy-Oxygen Complexes in Silicon Implanted with Substoichiometric Doses of Oxygen Ions
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