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Nontoxic Silicon Nanocrystals and Nanodiamonds as Substitution for Harmful Quantum Dots

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Anna Fucikova
Affiliation:
anna.fucikova@email.czAnna.Fucikova@mff.cuni.cz, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Chemical Physics and Optics, Prague 2, Czech Republic
Jan Valenta
Affiliation:
jan.valenta@mff.cuni.cz, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Chemical Physics and Optics, Prague, Prague 2, Czech Republic
Ivan Pelant
Affiliation:
pelant@fzu.cz, Institute of Physics of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Centre for Nanotechnologies and Materials for Nanoelectronics, Prague, Prague 6, Czech Republic
Vitezslav Brezina
Affiliation:
brezina@ufb.jcu.cz, University of South Bohemia, Institute of Physical Biology, Nove Hrady, Nove Hrady, Czech Republic
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Abstract

The commercially available semiconductor quantum dots have been proven to be slightly to significantly toxic by recent publications depending on the chemical composition. We are developing new non-toxic fluorescent labels based on (i) nanocrystalline silicon, suitable for in vivo studies due to their biodegrability, and on (ii) nanodiamonds, intended mainly for in vitro use due to their long-term stability and nondegradilibity.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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References

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