Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-h2zp4 Total loading time: 0.151 Render date: 2021-09-19T06:14:21.923Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Nanoscale Strain Measurements in Polymer Nanocomposites

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Qi Chen
Affiliation:
qichen2@uiuc.edu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Aerospace Engineering, Urbana, IL, 61801, United States
Ioannis Chasiotis
Affiliation:
chasioti@uiuc.edu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Aerospace Engineering, Urbana, IL, 61801, United States
Chenggang Chen
Affiliation:
Chenggang.Chen@wpafb.af.mil, University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, OH, 45469, United States
Ajit Roy
Affiliation:
Ajit.Roy@wpafb.af.mil, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH, 45469, United States
Get access

Abstract

The paper describes a multiscale experimental investigation of the mechanical behavior of polymer nanocomposites with nanoscale fused silica inclusions with the objective to shed light into the effect of the hard nanoparticles on the quasistatic mechanical behavior of epoxy matrix and the implications of the latter to the effective composite properties. The main variable in this study was the nanofiller volume fraction while the particle size was either 15 nm or 100 nm. Local strain measurements indicated strain field localization in the vicinity of the nanofillers at strains that macroscopically fall in the linearly elastic regime. The matrix strains were as high as three times the applied far field strain at applied effective strains of ∼ 1%. At larger stresses the local strain fields evolved to maxima that were considerably higher than the applied strain, and they were affected by local particle density and distribution. In composites with the largest particle volume fraction, 5 vol.%, 100 nm fillers, neighboring particles located in small proximities behaved as single large particles and often resulted in matrix strain shielding thus decreasing the benefit of the large surface-to-volume ratio and the associated efficiency in load transfer. On the other hand the 15 nm fillers resulted in more uniformly distributed deformation compared to composites with 100 nm particles.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Huang, H. H., Wilkes, G. L., Carlson, J.G., Polymer 30, 2001 (1989)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Honma, I., Nomura, S., Nakajima, H., Journal of membrane science, 185, 83 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Coronado, E., Galan-Mascaros, J.-R., Gomez-Garcia, C.-J., Laukhin, V., Nature, 408, 447 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Novak, B. M., Advanced Materials, 5, 422 (1993)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Pinnavaia, T.J., Science, 220, 365 (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Singh, R. P., Zhang, M., Chan, D., Journal of Material Science, 37(4), 781, (2002)Google Scholar
7. Rong, M. Z., Zhang, M. Q., Zheng, Y. X., Zeng, H. M., Walter, R., Friedrich, K., Polymer 42, 167 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Yang, F., Ou, Y., Yu, Z., Journal of Applied Polymer Science., 69, 355 (1998)3.0.CO;2-V>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Ou, Y., Yang, F., Yu, Z., Journal of Polymer Science, Part B, 36, 789 (1998)3.0.CO;2-G>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Heinrich, H., Vananti, A., Kostorz, G., Material Science & Engineering: A, 319321, 434 (2001)Google Scholar
11. Tanner, B. K., Wu, H. Z., Roberts, S. G., Applied Physics Letters, 86, 061909, (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Chasiotis, I., Knauss, W.G., Experimental Mechanics 42 (1), 51, (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Chasiotis, I., Cho, S.W., Jonnalagadda, K., Journal of Applied Mechanics 73 (5), 714, (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Mura, T., Micromechanics of Defects in Solids, Second, Kluwer Academic Pub. (1987)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Hill, R., Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids, 11(5), 289 (1963)Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Nanoscale Strain Measurements in Polymer Nanocomposites
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Nanoscale Strain Measurements in Polymer Nanocomposites
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Nanoscale Strain Measurements in Polymer Nanocomposites
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *