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Nanocrystalline SiC Formation From Sputter-Deposited Non-Equilibrium a-SixC1−x Alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

Hong Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801
Z. Ma
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801
L. H. Allen
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801
J. M. Rigsbee
Affiliation:
now at Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 360 BEC, Birmingham, AL 35294
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Abstract

There exists considerable interest in the synthesis of nanocrystalline SiC particles embedded in an a-SixC1−x:H matrix. This study investigated the formation of nanocrystalline SiC by annealing a non-equilibrium a-Si0.35C0.65 alloy sputter deposited onto oxidized (100) Si. Evolution of the microstructure was characterized by thin film sheet resistance measurements, glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that films annealed at temperatures below 850°C remained amorphous. Annealing at temperatures above 850°C resulted in the formation of SiC nanocrystallites, as revealed by GAXRD and TEM. The electrical conductivity also showed an abrupt increase around 950°C. Prolonged annealing resulted in a further increase in conductivity, implying that the transformation continued. Annealing at 1100°C for 3 hours increased the film conductivity by two orders of magnitude relative to the as-deposited film.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

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References

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Nanocrystalline SiC Formation From Sputter-Deposited Non-Equilibrium a-SixC1−x Alloys
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