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Nanocomposite with Very Large Electro-optic Effect and Widely Tunable Refractive Index

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Qin Chen
Affiliation:
quc101@psu.edu, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Electrical Engineering, 187 Materials Research Lab, University Park, PA, 16802, United States
Minren Lin
Affiliation:
mxr18@psu.edu, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Electrical Engineering, University Park, PA, 16802, United States
Jonathan E Lee
Affiliation:
jel236@psu.edu, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Electrical Engineering, University Park, PA, 16802, United States
Qiming Zhang
Affiliation:
qxz1@psu.edu, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Electrical Engineering, University Park, PA, 16802, United States
Shizhuo Yin
Affiliation:
sxy105@psu.edu, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Electrical Engineering, University Park, PA, 16802, United States
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Abstract

Very large electro-optic effect has been observed in relaxor ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorofluoroethylene) ( P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) ) terpolymer. By adding small amount of zinc sulfide (ZnS) nanoparticles, the refractive index of the nanocomposites can be tuned between about 1.4 and 1.5 while retaining large electro-optic effect and high transparency. Tunable long-period fiber gratings have been fabricated with the nanocomposite as the second cladding, and over 50nm of resonant wavelength shift has been achieved under a change of electric field of 30V/μm, which is much larger than other reported E-O tuning ranges. This corresponds to a pure refractive index change of the nanocomposite of Δn/n ∼ 0.4%.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

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