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Modification of Conducting Polymer Thin Film Interfaces Using Self-Assembled Monolayers Containing Transition Metal Complexes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2011

David M. Sarno
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, and Integrated Electronics and Engineering Center, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, 13902.
Sudhindra Prasad
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, and Integrated Electronics and Engineering Center, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, 13902.
Wayne E. Jones Jr
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Institute for Materials Research, and Integrated Electronics and Engineering Center, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, 13902.
Luis J. Matienzo
Affiliation:
IBM Microelectronics, Endicott, NY, 13760.
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Abstract

Thin films of polyaniline (PANi) have been in-situ deposited onto fused silica plates modified with ruthenium porphyrin and polypyridyl complexes coordinated to self-assembled monolayers of pyridyl-terminated alkylsilanes. Based on UV-vis and AFM studies, PANi exhibits a slower deposition rate and an earlier onset of secondary nucleation on the metal complex-modified interfaces. Electrical conductivity of the HCl-doped emeraldine salt form of PANi is increased to as high as 40 S/cm, relative to <1 S/cm on bare silica, measured under the same conditions and in the absence of any external modification to the polymer films. These changes are attributed to favorable π interactions between the aromatic surface species and the conjugated polymer that lead to a more expanded coil conformation for PANi.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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