Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-zvgck Total loading time: 0.328 Render date: 2021-06-20T19:41:14.883Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Microwave Plasma Assisted VHF-PECVD of Micro-Crystalline Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Wim Soppe
Affiliation:
Present adress: ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten, The Netherlands.
Julien Bailat
Affiliation:
Institute of Microtechnology (IMT), Rue A–L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Corinne Droz
Affiliation:
Institute of Microtechnology (IMT), Rue A–L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Urs Graf
Affiliation:
Institute of Microtechnology (IMT), Rue A–L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Ulrich Kroll
Affiliation:
Institute of Microtechnology (IMT), Rue A–L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Johannes Meier
Affiliation:
Institute of Microtechnology (IMT), Rue A–L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Arvind Shah
Affiliation:
Institute of Microtechnology (IMT), Rue A–L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Get access

Abstract

Growth of intrinsic micro-crystalline silicon layers by means of VHF-PECVD, assisted by remote microwave (MW) plasma has been investigated. The aim of the MW plasma is to enhance the deposition rate by introducing excited hydrogen and Ar atoms from the MW plasma in the VHF deposition zone. For this purpose a remote microwave plasma source was constructed in which a H2/Ar plasma is generated in a 20 mm diameter quartz tube. A gasshower has been constructed for homogeneous distribution of the flow of excited gas species from the microwave source into the deposition zone of the VHF-PECVD reactor where the dissociation of silane takes place. In a first series of experiments we applied high microwave power (< 500 W) and pure hydrogen in the MW source. This resulted in a larger deposition rate, but all layers – even grown at low silane concentrations – were amorphous and had a high oxygen content. The oxygen contamination was partly due to reduction of the quartz tube by the hydrogen plasma. In a second series of experiments Ar dilution and reduced MW power were used to eliminate the effect of etching of the tube by the microwave hydrogen plasma. In this series of experiments an increase of the growth rate of micro-crystalline silicon by about 15 % due to assistance of the microwave plasma was found. Optical emission spectroscopy indicates that – in these experiments – the main mechanism for the increased dissociation of silane is through molecular quenching reaction of Ar* metastables.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Meier, J. et al., J. of Non-Cryst. Sol. 227–230, 1250 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Vetterl, O. et al., Solar Energy Mat. Sol. Cells 62, 97 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Saito, K., et al., Proc. of the 2nd World Conf. on Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion, Vienna, 1998, p. 351.Google Scholar
4. Yamamoto, K. et al., Proc. of the 26 IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Anaheim, 1997, p. 575.Google Scholar
5. Meier, J. et al., Proc. of the 2nd World Conf. on Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion, Vienna, 1998, p. 375.Google Scholar
6. Howling, A. et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10, 1080 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Kondo, M., Suzuki, S., Nasuno, Y. and Matsuda, A., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 664 (2001) A4.3.1. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Hamasaki, T., et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 37, 1084 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Keppner, H., et al., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 452, 865 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Sansonnens, L., Howling, A.A., Hollenstein, Ch., Dorier, J.L. and Kroll, U., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 27, 1406 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Microwave Plasma Assisted VHF-PECVD of Micro-Crystalline Silicon
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Microwave Plasma Assisted VHF-PECVD of Micro-Crystalline Silicon
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Microwave Plasma Assisted VHF-PECVD of Micro-Crystalline Silicon
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *