Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-ln9sz Total loading time: 0.273 Render date: 2021-09-24T22:31:15.569Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Microcrystalline silicon solar cells prepared by 13.56 MHz PECVD at high growth rates: Solar cell and material properties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Tobias Roschek
Affiliation:
Institut für Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich, Germany
Bernd Rech
Affiliation:
Institut für Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich, Germany
Wolfhard Beyer
Affiliation:
Institut für Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich, Germany
Peter Werner
Affiliation:
Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, D-06120 Halle, Germany
Felix Edelman
Affiliation:
2Solid State Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa32000, Israel
Albert Chack
Affiliation:
2Solid State Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa32000, Israel
Raoul Weil
Affiliation:
2Solid State Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa32000, Israel
Robert Beserman
Affiliation:
2Solid State Institute, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa32000, Israel
Get access

Abstract

Microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) solar cells were prepared in a wide range of deposition parameters using 13.56 MHz plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The best μc-Si:H solar cells were prepared close to the transition to amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) growth at very high deposition pressures (∼10 Torr) showing solar cell efficiencies up to 8.0 % at a deposition rate of 5ÊÅ/s. Investigations of the solar cells were performed by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM measurements revealed similar structural properties with similar high crystalline volume fractions for these cells although they showed distinctly different efficiencies. However, an increased amorphous volume fraction was detected by Raman spectroscopy for the low efficiency cells prepared at low deposition pressures. This result is attributed to an increased ion bombardment at low pressures.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Meier, J., Vallat-Sauvain, E., Dubail, S., Kroll, U., Dubail, J., Golay, S., Feitknecht, L., Torres, P., Fay, S., Fischer, D., A. Shah, Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 66, 7384 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Saito, K., Sano, M., Matuda, K., Kondo, T., Nishimoto, T., Ogawa, K., Kajita, I., Proceedings of the 2nd World Conference and Exhibition on Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion, Vienna, Austria, 1998, p. 351Google Scholar
3. Vetterl, O., Finger, F., Carius, R., Hapke, P., Houben, L., Kluth, O., Lambertz, A., Mück, A., Rech, B., Wagner, H., Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 62, 97108 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Roschek, T., Müler, J., Wieder, S., Rech, B., Wagner, H., Proceedings of the 16th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Glasgow, UK (2000), p.561Google Scholar
5. Guo, L., Kondo, M., Fukawa, M., Saitoh, K., Matsuda, A., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 37, L1116–L1118 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Rech, B., Roschek, T., Müller, J., Wieder, S., Wagner, H., Technical Digest 11th International Photovoltaic Science and Engineering Conference, Sapporo (1999) 241, for more details see also: Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 66, 267273 (2001)Google Scholar
7. Roschek, T., Repmann, T., Müller, J., Rech, B., Wagner, H., Proceedings of the 28thIEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Anchorage, USA (2000), in printGoogle Scholar
8. Vetterl, O., Carius, R., Houben, L., Scholten, C., Luysberg, M., Lambertz, A., Finger, F., Wagner, H., Mat. Res.Soc. Symp. Proc. 609, A15.2 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Houben, L., Luysberg, M., Hapke, P., Carius, R., Finger, F., Wagner, H., Phil. Mag.A 77, 14471460 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Kluth, O., Löffl, A., Wieder, S., Beneking, C., Appenzeller, W., Houben, L., Rech, B., Wagner, H., Hoffmann, S., Waser, R., Selvan, J. A. Anna, Keppner, H., Proceedings of the 26th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference, Anaheim (1997), p. 715Google Scholar
11. Lihui, G., Rongming, L., Thin Solid Films 376, 249254 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Shah, A., Vallat-Sauvain, E., Torres, P., Meier, J., Kroll, U., Hof, C., Droz, C., Goerlitzer, M., Wyrsch, N., Vanecek, M., Materials Science and Engineering B 69–70, 219226 (2000 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Microcrystalline silicon solar cells prepared by 13.56 MHz PECVD at high growth rates: Solar cell and material properties
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Microcrystalline silicon solar cells prepared by 13.56 MHz PECVD at high growth rates: Solar cell and material properties
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Microcrystalline silicon solar cells prepared by 13.56 MHz PECVD at high growth rates: Solar cell and material properties
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *