Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-pftt2 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-20T19:11:02.023Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Mechanics Of Interfacial Crack Propagation In Microscratching

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Maarten P. de Boer
Affiliation:
present address - Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 MS 1413
John C. Nelson
Affiliation:
Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
William W. Gerberich
Affiliation:
Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
Get access

Abstract

A new probing technique has been developed to test thin film mechanical properties. In the Microwedge Scratch Test (MWST), a wedge shaped diamond indenter tip is drawn along a fine line, while simultaneously being driven into the line. We compare microwedge scratching of Zone 1 and Zone T thin film specimens of sputtered W on SiO2. Symptomatic of its poor mechanical properties, the Zone 1 film displays three separate crack systems. Because of its superior grain boundary strength, the Zone T film displayed only one of these - an interfacial crack system. Using bimaterial linear elastic fracture mechanics, governing equations are developed for propagating interfacial cracks, including expressions for strain energy release rate, bending strain, and mode mixity. Grain boundary fracture strength information may be deduced from the Zone 1 films, while adhesion may be inferred from the Zone T films.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Benjamin, P. and Weaver, C., Proc. Roy. Soc. A 254, 163 (1960).Google Scholar
2. Laugier, M. T., Thin Solid Films 117, 243 (1984).Google Scholar
3. Burnett, P. J. and Rickerby, D. S., Thin Solid Films 157, 233 (1988).Google Scholar
4. Marshall, D. B. and Evans, A. G., J. Appl. Phys. 56 (10), 2632 (1984).Google Scholar
5. Rosenfeld, L. G., Ritter, J. E., Lardner, T. J. and Lin, M. R., J. Appl. Phys. 67 (7), 3291 (1990).Google Scholar
6. Boer, M. P. de and Gerberich, W. W., Acta Metall. Mater., in press (1996).Google Scholar
7. Boer, M. P. de and Gerberich, W. W., Acta Metall. Mater., in press (1996).Google Scholar
8. Thornton, J. A., Ann. Rev. Mater. Sci. 7, 239 (1977).Google Scholar
9. Suo, Z. and Hutchinson, J. W., Int. J. Frac. 43, 1 (1990).Google Scholar
10. Haghiri-Gosnet, A. M., Ladan, F. R., Mayeux, C., Launois, H. and Joncour, M. C., J. Vac. Sci. Tech. A 7 (4), 2663 (1989).Google Scholar
11. Wu, T. W., J. Mater. Res. 6, 407 (1991).Google Scholar
12. Johnson, K. L., Contact Mechanics, (Cambridge, Malta, 1985).Google Scholar
13. Boer, M. P. de, Nelson, J. C. and Gerberich, W. W., Proc. Roy. Soc. A, submitted (1996).Google Scholar
14. Timoshenko, S. P. and Goodier, J. N., Theory of Elasticity, (Mc-Graw-Hill, New York, 1970).Google Scholar
15. Boer, M. P. de and Gerberich, W. W., J. Mater. Res., submitted (1996).Google Scholar