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Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanowiggles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2014

R. A. Bizao
Affiliation:
Applied Physics Department, State University of Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas-SP, Brazil
T. Botari
Affiliation:
Applied Physics Department, State University of Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas-SP, Brazil
D. S. Galvao
Affiliation:
Applied Physics Department, State University of Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas-SP, Brazil
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Abstract

In this work we have investigated the mechanical properties and fracture patterns of some graphene nanowiggles (GNWs). Graphene nanoribbons are finite graphene segments with a large aspect ratio, while GNWs are nonaligned periodic repetitions of graphene nanoribbons. We have carried out fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations using a reactive force field (ReaxFF), as implemented in the LAMPPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) code. Our results showed that the GNW fracture patterns are strongly dependent on the nanoribbon topology and present an interesting behavior, since some narrow sheets have larger ultimate failure strain values. This can be explained by the fact that narrow nanoribbons have more angular freedom when compared to wider ones, which can create a more efficient way to accumulate and to dissipate strain/stress. We have also observed the formation of linear atomic chains (LACs) and some structural defect reconstructions during the material rupture. The reported graphene failure patterns, where zigzag/armchair edge terminated graphene structures are fractured along armchair/zigzag lines, were not observed in the GNW analyzed cases.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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