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Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation of Poly (D, L) Lactic Acid Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Timothy M. Patz
Affiliation:
Bioengineering Program and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
Anand Doraiswamy
Affiliation:
Bioengineering Program and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
Roger Narayan
Affiliation:
Bioengineering Program and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
Nicola Menegazzo
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
Christine Kranz
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
Boris Mizaikoff
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
Rohit Modi
Affiliation:
US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA
Douglas B. Chrisey
Affiliation:
US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA
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Abstract

We have deposited poly (D, L lactic acid) (PDLLA) thin films using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). FTIR spectroscopy revealed that the PDLLA had similar absorption bands to the dropcast material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has shown that peaks corresponding to C-H, C-O and C=O represented 38.4, 30.1 and 31.4% of the C1s spectrum, respectively. XPS O1s analysis revealed that the O=C and O-C components make up 52 and 48 % of the O1s content. Atomic force microscopy revealed that MAPLE deposition provides smooth, continuous thin biomaterial films. These matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation-deposited biomaterial thin films may serve to improve the implant/tissue interface.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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